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  1. #1

    Default Patsy & the Ransom Note..A Hidden Truth?

    It's been a while since one of the only real pieces of evidence has been discussed in the media.
    The Hidden Truth - Sunday 06, March-2005
    by Melissa Wickham
    THOSE BIG EYES and that innocent smile still haunt him.

    Seven years have passed since the killing of six-year-old beauty queen JonBenet Ramsey – one of the high-profile murder cases in the United States – but one of the handwriting experts who worked on the case, David Liebman, can’t seem to shake the feeling that justice wasn’t served.

    Liebman was recently in Barbados working with attorney Michael Lashley on another case. He was brought here from Norfolk, Virginia, where he lives and works, by his friend and client, Barbadian Margaret Grant-Lawrence.
    While here, he visited the police department as well as the local handwriting expert and had this to say:

    “You have a very qualified handwriting expert locally, but she could use some better equipment. I don’t know if the Government has the money to supply it.
    “She’s very conscientious, but most of her equipment is donated,” he said.
    Liebman’s work on the JonBenet Ramsey case precedes him wherever he goes. He believes that the ransom note discovered by JonBenet’s mother Patsy Ramsey, the morning of December 26, 1996, the same day the little girl was found beaten, sexually assaulted, and strangled, was written by Patsy.

    He was hired by New York victims’ rights lawyer, Darnay Hoffman, to compare the handwriting on the three-page ransom note – a copy of which he brought to Barbados – with that of the mother, father John Ramsey, and JonBenet’s brother. But only one was a match – Patsy’s.

    “I looked for similarities and found a lot between the handwriting of the mother, Patsy Ramsey, and the writer of the ransom note,” said Liebman.
    The mother’s handwriting matched the jerky penmanship on the ransom note almost to a “T”.

    He noticed that the “d” in Patsy’s handwriting had a curve on the down stem like the ones in the note, and the “S”, “ro”, exclamation points and zeros were similarly formed.

    However, Liebman said that did not mean Patsy killed her daughter; it just meant she wrote the note.

    But some of the prosecutor’s handwriting experts did not see any similarities between Patsy’s handwriting and that on the note, so their findings were inconclusive.

    The case never went to trial and the murder remains unsolved. And, to this day, it still haunts Liebman.

    “Nothing happened, nothing was done about it. They never found the criminal. He/she is free and a little girl is dead,” said the certified document examiner – his official title.

    Besides the Ramsey case, Liebman, president of the National Association of Document Examiners, has worked on a number of other high profile cases like the Sniper case involving John Allen Muhammad and his teenage accomplice Lee Boyd Malvo.

    He also did some work on another case involving a teacher who was jailed for having sex with one of her students.
    High-profile cases

    Now, he’s currently working on a few other high-profile cases which he can’t discuss. Liebman’s fascination with handwriting started when he was just a teenager.

    “I noticed that handwritings were all different and I didn’t understand why,” he said.

    He became further fascinated with handwriting while studying the sciences and psychology nearly three decades ago.

    He has several degrees and worked seven years at a mental hospital. While there, he gathered the handwritings of patients with various mental illnesses and noticed similarities between them.
    And here is where it gets really interesting.

    Liebman can detect mental illnesses, learning disorders and even criminal behaviour just by examining a person’s handwriting.

    “Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) shows up in handwriting, as well as depression, schizophrenia, manic depression and other anti-social disorders,” said the expert.

    According to Liebman, there are a great number of learning disabilities in criminals’ handwriting. Part of the problem, he said, could be that they were frustrated with learning and, therefore, resorted to criminal behaviour.
    An expert like Liebman could detect, for instance, ADD or dyslexia probably before an educator noticed the signs.

    “There are several ways of detecting ADD. One way is extremely slow writing; a student is unable to finish a test because with ADD, his mind is constantly getting distracted, so he hesitates and he’s often the last person to finish.

    “Tremendous amounts of errors could also be ADD. Signs of impulsivity in handwriting also points to the disorder, such as crossing the “T” on the right side, extension lines in the handwriting at the end of a signature or a line between words are other signs,” explained Liebman, who is looking to formulate a test to detect ADD in children through their handwriting.

    He said he was open to working with educators here to help them detect learning disorders in students.

    Suicidal tendencies also show up in handwriting. Liebman has seen his share of suicide notes and they all usually have some commonality.
    If someone’s suicidal, their handwriting is often going uphill.

    “That’s a phenomenon in which the individual thinks ‘Well, I’ve come to the end, I don’t have to worry about the future,’” he said.

    “But when a manic- depressive individual is in a manic state, the flow of the line goes downhill.”

    Most suicidal people, if they’re manic depressives, said Liebman, actually commit suicide when they are coming out of a depression, when they are starting to feel better.

    There are various aspects of handwriting, said Liebman. One of them is forensics – determining whether a document is authentic – for example, wills, where sometimes a signature is traced, forged or altered.

    He can also detect signs of tampering. If a page is pulled out of a will or substituted by another, he can tell by analysing the paper or its watermarks.
    Simple clues most people wouldn’t look for, like staple marks on the substituted paper, are dead give-aways.

    “The individual doesn’t know there are clues like less staple marks. If you have three staple marks on all of the pages and only one staple mark on one or two then you know something is wrong,” he disclosed.

    Undoubtedly, his work keeps him quite busy but he also finds time for his other love – nature. Liebman is also a naturalist/biologist who has photographed thousands of species, especially those endangered, and has published articles in all of the major magazines and college textbooks on biology.

    He keeps hundreds of animals at his Virginia home and, it wasn’t unusual to see him looking under rocks and bushes at the hotel where he was staying, in search of whistling frogs, lizards and other local creatures.
    Source: http://www.nationnews.com/StoryView....2000%3A00%3A00

  2. #2
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    Thanks for posting this Little. Don't have the time to digest the posts much at the moment, but I can still read them to sidetrack me.

    You're right. It has been a while since the ransom note has been discussed, and it really is the most important piece of evidence. I would like to see someone from the FBI on CNN discussing the ransom note with John and Patsy Ramsey, wouldn't you? Can you see the Ramseys agreeing to this one?
    elle: The RST can't handle the truth!
    Just my opinion.

  3. #3

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    A discussion of the ransom note will result in a greater knowledge of its contents, and hence, a greater understanding of its author.

    Oops!

    A great read on this subject is A Mother Gone Bad by Andrew Hodges. I read this a couple of years ago and became 100% convinced of the RDI position. I don't know if it's been discussed here before - I'm sure it has - but Hodges analyzes the content of the note from a psycholinquistic position, rather than just the smoking-gun handwriting. In other words, he looks at hidden meanings of text.

    For instance, the use of percentages regarding the success of getting the kidnapped child back reflects cancer survivor rates, and scanning for electronic devices is evocative of cancer treatment.

    There are so many other things in the ransom note - "two gentlemen watching over your daughter" - Patsy used the phrase "two gentlemen" when she was writing an exemplar for the Boulder PD. The diacritical mark (caret) inserting "not" in the phrase "do not particularly like you" is something educated people use. Vocabulary - attache, faction, electronic. Alliteration - being beheaded, foreign faction. Miss Patsy like to alliterate.

    Best of all, SBTC Victory! Whatever SBTC stands for, Mrs. Ramsey also likes to use acronyms whenever possible. She has been known to sign off letters with PPRBSJ - meaning Patsy Paugh Ramsey Bachelor of Science in Journalism.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by wombat
    A discussion of the ransom note will result in a greater knowledge of its contents, and hence, a greater understanding of its author.

    Oops!

    A great read on this subject is A Mother Gone Bad by Andrew Hodges. I read this a couple of years ago and became 100% convinced of the RDI position. I don't know if it's been discussed here before - I'm sure it has - but Hodges analyzes the content of the note from a psycholinquistic position, rather than just the smoking-gun handwriting. In other words, he looks at hidden meanings of text.

    For instance, the use of percentages regarding the success of getting the kidnapped child back reflects cancer survivor rates, and scanning for electronic devices is evocative of cancer treatment.

    There are so many other things in the ransom note - "two gentlemen watching over your daughter" - Patsy used the phrase "two gentlemen" when she was writing an exemplar for the Boulder PD. The diacritical mark (caret) inserting "not" in the phrase "do not particularly like you" is something educated people use. Vocabulary - attache, faction, electronic. Alliteration - being beheaded, foreign faction. Miss Patsy like to alliterate.

    Best of all, SBTC Victory! Whatever SBTC stands for, Mrs. Ramsey also likes to use acronyms whenever possible. She has been known to sign off letters with PPRBSJ - meaning Patsy Paugh Ramsey Bachelor of Science in Journalism.
    Dr. Hodges' book is what convinced me of the Ramseys' guilt too, wombat. He also wrote a second book on the case, Who Will Speak for JonBenet, which was released about four and a half years ago.

    As far as the S.B.T.C here is my take on it-

    There is a period after the big S, there is a period after the big B, and there is a period after the big T but... there is no period after the big C.

    I think that pretty well sums it up.

  5. #5
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    Default Huh?

    "There is a period after the big S, there is a period after the big B, and there is a period after the big T but... there is no period after the big C.

    I think that pretty well sums it up."

    There is no period after the big C as in there is no period after the Big C and a hysterectomy?!?!

    RR

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by RiverRat
    There is no period after the big C as in there is no period after the Big C and a hysterectomy?!?!

    RR
    Yes, RiverRat. You got it.

  7. #7
    RiverRat's Avatar
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    Default Good One!

    But we are still left with S.B.T.!

  8. #8

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    I don't know about the lack of a dot after the C - maybe she was just finished, that's all.

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    I'm so lost... I can't imagine that very much thought was put into SBTC...it was a bogus ransom note written in distress...deep thought prolly wasn't going into it. imo

  10. #10

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    Hodges's books are great reading. Amazing Woody ignored both books whilst suing everyone in sight.

  11. #11

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    Lin didn't sue Hodges? I thought perhaps he did because the books aren't exactly famous. Hodges' assessment of Patsy (and John) is subtly devastating - maybe they didn't understand it.

  12. #12
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    "Hodges' assessment of Patsy (and John) is subtly devastating."

    I think that's worth repeating.



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