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  1. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Watching You
    I thought Burke acted like a space cadet from everything I saw of him on film and in pictures. I wouldn't expect a four or five year old to comprehend much of what was going on, but Burke was nine years old and old enough to grasp at least some of it. He was either a very immature nine year old or he was just so wrapped up in his own little world that he never showed what I would call appropriate respect or grief for his sister's death. Of course, I only saw brief shots of him walking behind his parents at the funeral, and I've only read of his leaving the house that morning to go to the Whites' house - no questions as to why the police were there or his mother was upset, no questions about what happened to JonBenet. It's possible that he did mourn his sister when the camera wasn't on him.

    I always thought that picture of John and Patsy Ramsey walking (with smiles on their faces like they thought something was very amusing) and Burke walking behind them (with the same smile on his face) was bizarre. What on earth could be further from amusing than burying your murdered daughter and sister?

    I believe Burke heard a lot that night. If his conscious mind has forgotten it, which is entirely possible, his unconscious mind has not forgotten. He's been brainwashed for years. His conscious mind most likely beileves his parents were innocent.
    From what little I have read about Burke, he almost sounds as if he has Asberger's Syndrome or is slightly "quirky," (which is what people with these "syndromes" used to be called). His reactions aren't "normal" because he may be a person who doesn't feel emotions in the same way you and I would. Now, this is just speculation but in PMPT he is described by the gardener as always playing by himself, doing things on his own, not interacting with people the way JBR would. Not merely introverted. That might explain why he just went out of the house that morning and didn't ask any questions - and perhaps why he doesn't seem to be troubled now. He has put that night and morning into a category or a box in his mind, and it is not to be explored.

    At some point, if his father passes away and he is asked, he may have astounding memories about that night and morning. If he's anywhere on the autistic spectrum, he might just remember every second.
    Last edited by Cherokee; September 4, 2006, 10:27 am at Mon Sep 4 10:27:38 UTC 2006.
    "We're not necessarily doubting that God will do the best for us; we are wondering how painful the best will turn out to be." - C.S. Lewis

    MY OPINIONS - DO NOT COPY THEM ANYWHERE ELSE ON THE INTERNET!

  2. #14

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    Burke Ramsey is a socially active sophomore at Purdue University studying to be an engineer and is making good grades. He had a B+ average in high school (around 3.5 IIRC) and was on his high school swim team.

    This doesn't sound like any syndromes to me (except maybe geek). There's no evidence he messed with his little sister and the police did not consider him to be a suspect. He was a little kid who had some tough smit to deal with (Mom with cancer and two sisters killed) and he is doing very well.

    He is leading his life and I hope the press leaves him alone.

  3. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Watching You
    To be absolutely accurate, the pineapple was not found in JB's stomach. It was found in her upper intestine. I know it's only a matter of a few inches, but since the forum is getting a lot of visits these days, the more accuracy we have, the better.
    Thanks for the catch.
    I fixed it.
    So, if you were 6 yrs old, would you eat pineapple with a stranger in the middle of the night? What about the pineapple that was found in Jonbenet's small intestine?

  4. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by wombat
    Burke Ramsey is a socially active sophomore at Purdue University studying to be an engineer and is making good grades. He had a B+ average in high school (around 3.5 IIRC) and was on his high school swim team.

    This doesn't sound like any syndromes to me (except maybe geek). There's no evidence he messed with his little sister and the police did not consider him to be a suspect. He was a little kid who had some tough smit to deal with (Mom with cancer and two sisters killed) and he is doing very well.

    He is leading his life and I hope the press leaves him alone.
    Well, you may be right - something just struck me about the way he seemed detached when interviewed, etc. That is just my impression and I don't know very much about him, other than what I have read so far and what has been discussed here on the forum (like how he asked about the detective's Rolex during the interview about what he knew about the killing).

    I actually hope for his sake that he doesn't remember, if he did know, anything about that night and morning.
    "We're not necessarily doubting that God will do the best for us; we are wondering how painful the best will turn out to be." - C.S. Lewis

    MY OPINIONS - DO NOT COPY THEM ANYWHERE ELSE ON THE INTERNET!

  5. #17

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    Just to be accurate for all the newbies and guests... like WY said ...........

    Burke wasn't eight when JonBenet was killed. He was nine, almost 10 years old. His birthday is in January.

    If Burke doesn't remember that time in his life, it's because he has blocked it out of his conscious mind, but I wholeheartedly agree it's there in his subconscious. And someday, there will be a trigger that will make it all come back to him with full force.

  6. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by heymom
    Well, you may be right - something just struck me about the way he seemed detached when interviewed, etc. That is just my impression and I don't know very much about him, other than what I have read so far and what has been discussed here on the forum (like how he asked about the detective's Rolex during the interview about what he knew about the killing).

    I actually hope for his sake that he doesn't remember, if he did know, anything about that night and morning.
    Burke's actions during that interview was that of a person who doesn't want to think, or talk, about the topic being discussed. It was typical "avoidance behavior."

    You may be right about the Asperger's Syndrome but most people with that condition are very intelligent and able to function in society. Many "geeks" have undiagnosed Asperger's. There's nothing wrong with them, it's just that they process feelings and the world around them differently than the majority of the population.

    But I still think a lot of Burke's behavior was dictated by his parents and by his wanting to avoid the subject of JonBenet's death. His actions are also typical of a person who blocks out a painful event so they don't have to deal with the emotions it elicits.
    Last edited by Cherokee; September 4, 2006, 11:36 am at Mon Sep 4 11:36:48 UTC 2006. Reason: left out a word

  7. #19
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    he knows something...maybe not everything...maybe not the context...but he knows someting.. he simply logically has to..
    he may not want to.. he may not like to.. but he was in that house ..with very few people when his sister was murdered...paint it any which way you like.. he was there..it happened..he knows it !!
    These are my opinions only ( no copying now !! ), and of course assume all to be innocent !! of course !!

  8. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cherokee
    You may be right about the Asperger's Syndrome but most people with that condition are very intelligent and able to function in society. Many "geeks" have undiagnosed Asperger's.
    I knew somebody was going to go there.

    WE'RE NOT "UNDIAGNOSED SYNDROME SUFFERERS!!!"

    WE JUST LIKE MATH!!!

    When I first read about this latest fad, Asperger's Syndrome, I laughed until the pens fell out of my pocket protector.

    Half the people I work with could be "diagnosed" with this syndrome. They don''t look you in the eye, they don't care about minor emotions, they would SO much rather figure out the freaking flow for the air handling unit than smell the roses.

    So what, it's not a syndrome. To me, it's like some psychologist ran out of things to do and decided to name a type of person a "syndrome" so they could get a paper published.

    Back to Burke - I think it's really nasty to say he has this "condition" when we don't know him, and even nastier to link it to possible autism (as the shrinks are trying to do in general).

    But I still think a lot of Burke's behavior was dictated by his parents and by his wanting to avoid the subject of JonBenet's death. His actions are also typical of a person who blocks out a painful event so they don't have to deal with the emotions it elicits.
    This I agree with, Cherokee. The poor kid.

  9. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by wombat
    I knew somebody was going to go there.

    WE'RE NOT "UNDIAGNOSED SYNDROME SUFFERERS!!!"

    WE JUST LIKE MATH!!!

    When I first read about this latest fad, Asperger's Syndrome, I laughed until the pens fell out of my pocket protector.

    Half the people I work with could be "diagnosed" with this syndrome. They don''t look you in the eye, they don't care about minor emotions, they would SO much rather figure out the freaking flow for the air handling unit than smell the roses.

    So what, it's not a syndrome. To me, it's like some psychologist ran out of things to do and decided to name a type of person a "syndrome" so they could get a paper published.

    Back to Burke - I think it's really nasty to say he has this "condition" when we don't know him, and even nastier to link it to possible autism (as the shrinks are trying to do in general).



    This I agree with, Cherokee. The poor kid.
    I wasn't trying to be nasty. Years ago, if people didn't quite fit into "normal" (you notice I put it in quotes to emphasize that normal is a concept not a reality), they could be called "quirky," "different," or "unusual." I brought up Asperger's b/c I am very interested in this type of thing. Of course, when you are interested in something and read a lot about it, you tend to see it more than others do. I have a son with "ADHD," which is also a created syndrome, and basically means he cannot succeed in the type of education we have now without a lot of adaptation on his part. God created him just the way he is and for a reason, not to be medicated out of it. He is like our Steve Irwin (God rest his beautiful soul) and most of the time, we love him for it.

    People who just love math do not qualify for any diagnosis (at least I hope not, because I love math too!). But autism is real and it comes in different strengths. Asperger's used to be called "high-functioning autism." I am sorry if I offended you.

    We don't have to discuss this any more. And I wasn't trying to be nasty.
    "We're not necessarily doubting that God will do the best for us; we are wondering how painful the best will turn out to be." - C.S. Lewis

    MY OPINIONS - DO NOT COPY THEM ANYWHERE ELSE ON THE INTERNET!

  10. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by heymom
    I wasn't trying to be nasty. Years ago, if people didn't quite fit into "normal" (you notice I put it in quotes to emphasize that normal is a concept not a reality), they could be called "quirky," "different," or "unusual." I brought up Asperger's b/c I am very interested in this type of thing. Of course, when you are interested in something and read a lot about it, you tend to see it more than others do. I have a son with "ADHD," which is also a created syndrome, and basically means he cannot succeed in the type of education we have now without a lot of adaptation on his part. God created him just the way he is and for a reason, not to be medicated out of it. He is like our Steve Irwin (God rest his beautiful soul) and most of the time, we love him for it.

    People who just love math do not qualify for any diagnosis (at least I hope not, because I love math too!). But autism is real and it comes in different strengths. Asperger's used to be called "high-functioning autism." I am sorry if I offended you.

    We don't have to discuss this any more. And I wasn't trying to be nasty.
    You weren't nasty!! I'm not offended!! Well, maybe I'm offended by the guy who dreamed this stuff up, but not you!!

  11. #23
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    After reading the symptoms of Aspergers on line, I am now convinced that everyone at the swamp has it.
    Keep me away from the wisdom which does not cry,
    the philosophy which does not laugh,
    and the greatness which does not bow before children.

    ---Kahlil Gibran---

  12. #24
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    I have taught four boys who were diagnosed with Aspergers over the years and I'm glad to say that we have sufficient knowledge and understanding of the condition nowadays to cope with it in mainstream. Of the four I've taught, I'd say that only 2 were possibly genuine and the other two were misdiagnosed. A fifth boy almost certainly had Aspergers and was undiagnosed because his parents refused to have him labelled. It's a pity when that happens because labels can be enormously beneficial in getting the pupil, the support that he/she needs.

    I doubt Burke has Aspergers - he may show some traits, but many of US do (yes I include myself in there!)

    I recently taught a boy with Aspergers for three years on the trot and he was a delight. I stuck to the guidelines for teaching him and we had no problems at all. Aspergers don't like changes to schedule and they like their environment to remain constant. So we let them keep the same desk which may be slightly isolated from the rest to allow them to have some space. We don't force them to participate in group projects - or if they do, we select their team-mates carefully. We make sure we tell them what we're going to do next - and then we stick to the plan. They often don't understand jokes because they take things very literally so jokes need to be explained.

    Recently, a friend of mine called me to tell me that her 4 year old may have Aspergers. I wasn't surprised because I suspected it myself but it wasn't my place to say. I was able to reassure her that my personal experience of teaching pupils with Aspergers has been positive and rewarding.

    Incidentally, not all Aspergers are high functioning. My definitely-genuine Aspergers boy struggled with most subjects althougb he could do some amazing memory tricks and could tell you anything you ever wanted to know about the subject of his obsession :-)
    This is my opinion and it may not be copied in whole or in part without my written permission



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