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  1. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paradox
    Linda McLean, in her book, says the re-write was titled "Deadline". I remember Patsy said something about death when asked about her pageant performances. But I don't remember the re-write ever having been mentioned as having the title "Kiss of Death".
    I remember reading Linda McLean helped Patsy to write the winning speech by zapping up another one "overnight" related to copyright and censorship, due to not being able to use the actual speech from "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie" because of copyright. The title "Deadline" seems to fit.
    elle: The RST can't handle the truth!
    Just my opinion.

  2. #38

    Default Chapter 5

    Chapter 5

    The portrait of Rose looked like Miss Jean Brodie. Artist Teddy Lloyd’s wife Deirde (re MJB): “Is she fair?” “No, she’s dark.” Red velvet draped made Rose look one armed, like the artist himself.

    Also painted Monica and Eunice in her harlequin outfit. Sandy was fascinated by the economy of Teddy Lloyd’s method, as she was by Miss Brodie’s variation on the love story. Economical, most expedient, most suitable at the time.

    Sandy: Keep together the Brodie set at the expense of the newly glimpse of individuality of its members.

    A painting of the Brodie set: “We’d look like one big Miss Brodie, I suppose.

    “The near blackmailing insolence of her knowledge.” He kissed her.

    There was nothing for her to do but follow him downstairs. The sitting room. “Oh play to me Gipsy.”

    Teddy Lloyds wife: “Bring Miss Brodie to tea.” “Pass me a fag.”

    Miss Brodie was always careful to impress the parents of the set and win their approval and gratitude.

    Golf. This was a clever question because it articulated what was already growing in Sandy’s mind. Jenny had bored her this year, and it left her lonely. Miss Brodie towering above her, for Sandy was playing out of a bunker. Sandy gave a hack with her niblick and said, “Yes, a bit,” sending the ball in a little backward half-circle.

    Difficult to follow Miss Brodie’s prophetic moods. One had to wait and see what emerged.

    Eunice will settle down and marry some professional man. Monica will get her B of Sc with honours, no spiritual insight, bad temper, and she understands signs, symbols and calculations. “Everyday is the Lord’s day.”

    Miss Brodie to Sandy: “You must get spectacles.” You have got insight, perhaps not quite spiritual, but you’re a deep one and Rose has got instinct.

    Sandy: At St Giles Cathedral contemplates these emblems of dark and terrible salvation, which made the fires of the damned seem very merry to the imagination by contrast, and much preferable. Calvinism
    Lower social status, she felt deprived of it, however undesirable it might be, she didn’t want to be protected by it. She desired something definite, like Calvinism, to reject. She desired this birthright...see the blackened monuments and hear the curses of drunken men and women and comparing their faces with the familiar faces, she saw, with stabs of new and exciting Calvinistic guilt, that there was not much difference.

    Miss Brodie with more exotic suicidal enchantment than if she had simply taken to drink like other spinsters who couldn’t stand it anymore.

    Rose and Sandy had been chosen be the crème de la crème.

    Miss Brodie liked to take her leisure over the unfolding of her plans, most of her joy deriving from the preparation, and moreover, the girls were too young.

    “Sandy will make an excellent Secret Service agent, a great spy.”

    Sandy slept with Teddy Lloyd and Rose carried back the information.

    Panama hats, each adorning, in magical transformation, a different Jean Brodie.

    Sandy: Miss Brodie looked misled, looked beautiful, fragile, just as dark heavy Edinburgh itself, when light fell on it. Miss Brodie’s features, clear and sweet to Sandy. When viewed in the curious light of the woman’s folly.

    Brodie set: no team spirit at school. Theatres and teas. Neglect and Lowther. Sandy: Miss Jean Brodie stopped sleeping with Lowther because her sexual feelings were satisfied by proxy. Rose was predestined to be his lover.

    MJB renounced Teddy Lloyd. Lowther was useful. Sandy: MJB renounced Teddy Lloyd only because she was aware that she could not keep up this beauty. It was a quality in her that came and went.

    Next term, after Mr. Lowther returned from his honeymoon, MJB put her spare energy into her plan for Sandy and Rose and political ideas.
    Last edited by Cranberry; December 3, 2006, 3:34 am at Sun Dec 3 3:34:00 UTC 2006.

  3. #39

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    In Chapter 5, the Brodie set are growing up and finding their own way. Sandy is fascinated to see a different, darker side of real life that she already had embraced in her thoughts. I think this is a turning point, and would like to know: Were the depths of destruction her reality?

  4. #40
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    I think the realization of the depths of self destruction and hypocracy were her reality at this point. The following line is classic Spark;

    "In this oblique way, she [Sandy] began to sense what went to the makings of Miss Brodie who had elected herself to grace in so particular a way and with more exotic suicidal enchantment than if she had simply taken to drink like other spinsters who couldn't stand it any more."

    In that sentence Spark allows Sandy to reach the bottom line; what Freud called the death wish, self avoidance/self denial to the point of self destruction.

  5. #41

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    I think Sandy was so evil she could see the self destruction in Miss Brodie but not in herself - not due to self denial but in relishment of it! The psychology between Sandy and Miss Brodie is very complex and wide open to interpretation. Especially to a novice like me. What happened that turned Sandy's evil thoughts into acting upon them?

  6. #42
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    Sandy didn't start out "evil" of course, she was an innocent child under the influence of a pathological narcissist who used people. Sandy progressed in her awareness of the world as it is. She is not to be faulted for looking and using her innate intuition.. Where she falters is becoming LLoyds lover, which I think she did to spite Brodie and exercise her own powers to counteract Brodie's. She then compensates for her "sins" by becoming a nun. Sandy's act of betrayal was a moral calculation, a judgement against Brodie's negative influence on girls, her hypocracy and at the same time a judgement on the darkness of the world in general. She then retreated from the world and wrote a book on psychology called "The Transfiguration of the Commonplace." There may be no heroes in TPOMJB.

  7. #43

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    Yes, I agree about Sandy and Miss Brodie's influence and expectations. I remember a part in the book when young Sandy was hateful, yet again, to Mary Macgregor and Sandy paused and thought about how it might feel to be nice to her for a change, but she went ahead and punched her, as watchful Miss Brodie was nearby. I think there were many conflicts in Sandy's mind, but she ultimately did have a transformation. I relate this to discussions about the personal shadow and the dark side of the psyche. I would like to know more about this aspect of it, in general. Thank you.

  8. #44
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    Mary did not have the wherewithall to be critical of Jean Brodie. She died in a fire not knowing which way to flee. She was consumed literally.

    It was Sandy who had the insight to be critical of Brodie. She ended iwth a self imposed isolation.

    Brodie died isolated and betrayed, consumed from the inside by a cancer.

    Each character had a dark and light side.

  9. #45

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    After the girls schooling was finished, the other girls began having their own interests and shook off Miss Brodie, but not Sandy.

  10. #46
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    That's because Sandy is Muriel Spark.

  11. #47

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    And Sandy's biggest influence? "Miss Jean Brodie in her prime."

  12. #48
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    Jean Brodie is Miss Kay, Spark's elementary school teacher, who, so far as I know, was largely a positive figure to Muriel Camberg (maiden name). I'm not yet through her autobiography, but she doesn't claim or even mention Sandy Stranger.



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