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  1. #1

    Default 20/20...In hindsight....

    Just rereading these old articles, and now that we know Patsy so well, some of the parallel behaviors she exhibited in her life just jumped out at me. So I thought, for your consideration, you might have some "AHA!" moments as well:


    The JonBenet Ramsey Case
    Are they innocent?
    Friends say the Ramseys couldn't have killed JonBenet

    By Lisa Levitt Ryckman
    Rocky Mountain News Staff Writer 1997, Rocky Mountain News

    At first, John and Patsy Ramsey were grieving parents mourning the murder of their 6-year-old daughter.
    This story is the result of more than 40 interviews with John and Patsy Ramsey's friends, family and business associates, most of whom had refused to speak with the media. The Ramseys declined to be interviewed.
    For exclusive Ramsey family photos, see the Sunday, August 17 issue of the Rocky Mountain News.
    At first, everyone grieved with them.
    And then, everyone suspected them.
    The initial outpouring of sympathy for the Ramseys after the discovery of JonBenet's bound and battered body the day after Christmas quickly turned into ugly innuendo, relentless examination and screaming supermarket tabloid headlines.
    Yet no charges have been filed, and through it all the couple have maintained their innocence. And the people who have known them best and longest and most intimately believe them.
    "They have been hunted -- haunted -- everywhere. Unbelievably so,'' said Carole Simpson, a long-time family friend. "And when you lose your daughter, and you lose your house, and you lose your privacy, and you don't know who's out there who's done this, and you don't know what else may happen ...it's overwhelming.''
    In the merciless court of public opinion, John and Patsy Ramsey have been tried and convicted thousands of times over.
    Authorities say the Ramseys are the focus of their investigation. No one else is known to have been in the house the night of the murder, and Patsy Ramsey has not been ruled out as the author of the "ransom'' note.
    But the people who know them say the Ramseys most of the world have criticized and condemned -- the billion-dollar businessman and his beauty queen wife, living in some rarefied stratosphere above the law -- are cartoonish caricatures.
    They often bring up the name Richard Jewell -- the innocent man convicted first by the FBI, then by the press. The Ramseys have been criticized for what they've done -- going on CNN, hiring attorneys and publicists -- and what they haven't done: mainly, talking to police immediately after JonBenet's body was found.
    They have been criticized for their privileged lifestyle, for putting JonBenet in beauty pageants, for doing things most of middle America doesn't. They have been criticized for launching their own investigation, for the way they have grieved, for the way they looked on television. Patsy, 40, was too emotional, people said after they appeared on CNN; John, 53, was not emotional enough.

    Patsy and John Ramsey leave St. John's Episcopal Church in Boulder after services on Jan. 5. Cindy Ramsey Johnson, Ramsey's ex-wife, said of John:"Everyone has two faces. What you see of John right now is his public face. . . . You don't see the tears, and you don't see the grief."
    Rodolfo Gonzalez/Rocky Mountain News
    "I think you have a private face, and you have a public face,'' said Cindy Ramsey Johnson, John's first wife. "Everyone has two faces. What you see of John right now is his public face. You don't see his private face. You don't see the tears, and you don't see the grief. That doesn't mean they're not there.''
    The Ramseys their friends know are people who have suffered with dignity, intelligence and grace through more tragedy in the past five years than many people know in a lifetime: the accidental death of one daughter; a touch-and-go battle with cancer; the murder of another daughter.
    Now, nearly eight months after JonBenet's murder, the Ramseys' closest friends and family want other people to know what they know, to have some sense of why their faith in John and Patsy Ramsey remains constant, steadfast, utterly unshakable.
    "There are people who are questioning them. But my response is always, 'Well, you don't know them,''' said Mary Justice, a friend in Atlanta for almost 18 years. "People who don't know them are convicting them. Because they say there are just too many circumstances that are just too unanswerable. Which is true, very true. But I know in my heart that I'll stick with them to the end. I know they've got a lot of friends who are doing that.''
    These are the people who have known and supported the Ramseys through a chronology of crises, a series of events that shattered the couple's happy life, beginning with the death of John's oldest child, Elizabeth Pasch Ramsey.
    Everyone called her Beth. She was 22 and in love on the winter day she died.
    Her relationship with Matthew Derrington became serious enough that around Christmas of 1991, Beth flew to Chicago to meet his parents. It was during that trip that the couple's car was hit by a semitrailer truck. Beth died from those injuries on Jan. 8, 1992.
    "She had just graduated from college, she was working for Delta. Everyone was real proud of her at that time, real happy for her,'' said John Andrew Ramsey, Beth's younger brother. "To see her life get taken like that was an incredible loss for all of us -- Dad in particular. She was his first child, his first daughter.''
    "It was so out of the blue,'' said Carole Simpson, a long-time Atlanta friend. "She was doing well, she was happy, she was pretty. Everything was going along just as it should have. Then she was killed. And John was just devastated. The suddenness and the shock and everything was just more than he could come to grips with.''
    "I think there's no difference when a child dies, whether that child suffered a long serious illness or if the child was taken from you suddenly in an accident,'' said Cindy Ramsey Johnson, Beth's mother. "The grieving is the same.''
    John was overwhelmed, shocked, heartbroken. "I had never seen him like that,'' said long-time friend Jayne Kloster of Atlanta. He and Cindy planned Beth's funeral together.
    For Patsy, it was a time to watch over John, to make sure that everything was handled for him. The night before Beth's funeral, Patsy called some of their friends and asked them to come to a gathering at Cindy's house to support John.
    "She thought of things like that,'' Carole Simpson said. "When we got there, we realized she had read the situation perfectly. Cindy's brothers and sisters were there. Her friends were there. It was her house. It was an awkward situation. He appreciated the fact that we came.''
    John didn't like the large cemetery most people in their Atlanta neighborhood used because of strict rules about what could be done to a gravesite. So Patsy located a small Episcopal cemetery near the church where the service was held. And she had the plot landscaped, in the dead of winter, with flowers. She had a small bench put in, so family and friends could sit and pray.


    Two of John Ramsey's daughters lie in a cemetery in Marietta, Ga. JonBenet's unmarked grave is next to Beth's marked one. "I think there's no difference when a child dies," said Cindy Ramsey Johnson, Beth's mother. "The grieving is the same."
    Ellen Jaskol/Rocky Mountain News
    "She made sure everything looked just right. She was just there for John. She made sure there were always people around,'' Simpson said. "He was very sad for a long time.''
    Almost five years later, just days before Christmas 1996, Patsy received a call from Jayne Kloster. Her husband, Gil, had an older son whose newborn girl had died four days after her birth.

    "It was devastating. But I knew with what (Patsy and John) had gone through with Beth that Patsy would be the person to talk to about it,'' Kloster said.
    She was. "Losing a child and burying a child is about the hardest thing anyone will ever do in their life,'' Patsy told Jayne.
    "She went on to tell me how John suffered after Beth died, had read every book on losing a child and burying a child and how difficult it was,'' Kloster added. "She was just telling me how painful the experience was, how it was something that never goes away but they had gotten through it the best they could. But it was through prayer and God and their strong faith.''
    Later that day, a bouquet of flowers arrived from Patsy.
    That's the sort of people the Ramseys are, their friends say: generous people whose generosity has kept pace with their growing wealth. "You didn't ever say around her, 'Someday, I'd like to have (whatever),' because the next day it would be delivered to your door,'' said Pamela Griffin, a friend of Patsy's whose daughter babysat JonBenet.
    Down-to-earth, say their friends and family. The kind of people who invite the neighbors in for pancakes in their pajamas. Consummate hosts who, as one friend put it, could take a frog and make it feel like the most wonderful thing at the party.
    Trusting people, who left the side door unlocked in Boulder so their children's friends could come and go. Patsy liked having the neighborhood kids in so she always knew where to find JonBenet and her older brother Burke.
    Both natural-born leaders. Both first-born children. Both products of small-town upbringings -- she in West Virginia, he in Michigan.
    "We had a wonderful, leave-it-to-Beaver family,'' said John's younger brother, Jeff Ramsey, of their middle-class upbringing by their parents, Mary Jane and Jay, a highly decorated transport pilot in World War II who eventually became director of the Michigan Aeronautics Commission.
    "Our parents were both very calm, loving people,'' Jeff Ramsey said. "You couldn't have asked for a better family life.''
    Friends say John has the Ramsey reserve -- not the type to display emotion publicly, either affection or anger -- but shows passion about things that matter to him: his family, his business, his hobbies, including race-sailing and flying.
    He was the man you wanted at the controls when the plane hit rough weather, said his friend, Gil Kloster, who had flown with John under those circumstances.
    "John's the kind of person who comes to the dinner table, may not say a thing all evening, and yet no one ever considers John Ramsey as an introverted, shy, withdrawn person,'' Kloster said. "If John has something to say, he'll come across as very wise or extremely funny and appropriate. He's got a very dry humor that can break everybody up.''


    The Ramseys pose for the portrait used in Christmas Cards in 1996. John Ramsey stands with his children Melinda and John Andrew. Patsy Ramsey holds their children JonBenet and Burke.
    For the Rocky Mountain News
    Patsy and John met each other through mutual friends in Atlanta after John's divorce from Cindy in 1978, which Cindy declined to discuss. They married on Nov. 15, 1980.
    The Ramseys were fun to be around, their friends say; one year, they celebrated the Klosters' anniversary by decorating their trees with toilet paper, and leaving a sign on the lawn to make sure the couple knew who was responsible.

    They struggled with John's computer business in those early years. Gil Kloster remembers them fretting over a tiny ad they placed in the Atlanta paper, wondering whether it would get any response.
    Members of Patsy's family worked for John in Atlanta; her father, Don Paugh, a former Union Carbide engineer, helped create the company that merged in 1988 with two others to form Access Graphics, a distributor of high-performance computer equipment based in Boulder.
    For more than a year, John Ramsey commuted from Atlanta for his job as vice president of sales.
    In 1991, Lockheed Martin acquired Access, and Ramsey became Access president. Now he needed to be in Boulder full time, and he needed Patsy and the children with him. Patsy agreed to move to Boulder in 1991, even though it meant leaving most of her family and friends.

    In five years, John Ramsey shepherded the company from $150 million in sales to more than $1 billion.
    Success changed them little, their friends say. John was still ambitious, but unassuming. A man whose favorite vehicle while he lived in Atlanta was a 15-year-old Chevy pickup. A man who was mistaken for a mechanic while tending his own airplanes.
    "John's the kind of guy that if you were to meet him and talk to him for the first time, you would come away never knowing he was the president of a billion-dollar company, or that he had any money at all,'' Jeff Ramsey said.
    Patsy shared that lack of pretention. Even her closest friends knew her for years before learning she had been Miss West Virginia.
    Always beautiful, but never the beauty queen type -- that was Patsy from childhood. At Parkersburg High School, she was never the prom queen or the homecoming queen. She was, instead, the queen of overachievers in a school full of them.
    "She was really about being in the background, just doing all kinds of more important things. She was so bright, she was just the kind of person who was a leader,'' said Charlene Pearman, who was a year ahead of Patsy and served on the student council with her.
    "If she had an idea, she wasn't afraid to try to get it implemented. It was just amazing. She had a lot of energy. She was more about doing important things. She was just so mature, and maybe saw life from a deeper point of view.''
    Patsy cared about doing things that mattered, but it mattered little to her if others were aware of what she had accomplished. Pearman and others were shocked on the high school's award's day to see Patsy sitting in front of two banquet tables loaded with trophies for speech, drama and academics.
    Talented and resourceful, Patsy was a forensics coach's dream, said Linda Edison McLean, who met Patsy in 1973, when McLean started coaching the school's speech and debate teams.
    "It would be like a first-year basketball coach finding an all-American on the team,'' McLean said. Patsy's particular strength was oral interpretation, which requires a student to interpret a scene from a story or play without costume or props.
    Patsy won the state championship in both her junior and senior years and placed second in a national competition for her interpretation of a scene from the play The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, the same scene she used to win the Miss West Virginia pageant in 1977.


    Jim Smith, of Parkersburg, W. Va., produced beauty pageants, and Betty Smith was Patsy Ramsey's chaperone for the 1977 Miss America contest. Betty remembers Patsy as "down to earth. . .she always thought about the other person."
    For the Rocky Mountain News
    "When she was into the beauty pageant stuff, it kind of surprised me,'' Pearman said. "I really didn't think it was about wanting to put on a bathing suit and prance around. I really thought it probably was more about what she was going to do with that scholarship money. Especially since I'd never really seen her put an emphasis on beauty.''
    For the Miss America Pageant, Patsy wrote a dramatic scene called Deadline based on a local textbook controversy, featuring a journalist with traditional ideas and a young innovative school teacher that expressed Patsy's views about press freedom and censorship.
    It took about 40 hours to write and edit, said Linda McLean, who helped Patsy with it. "It's ironic that Patsy then protested censorship, and now the tabloid press is using its 'freedom' to lie and distort facts and falsely accuse Patsy,'' McLean said.

    Patsy didn't make the final 10, but she won a talent award and a $2,000 scholarship.
    Preparing for the Miss America Pageant plunges most contestants into chaos, with little time to think about or do anything else. But Patsy put together a fashion show to thank everyone who had supported her and the pageant, and opened it to the public.
    "She's someone who really appreciated everything she was given, not someone who says, 'Where's my dress? How much can I spend?''' said Dianne Lough, another former Miss West Virginia and a friend of Patsy's since childhood. "She was someone who was always intensely aware of other people's feelings.
    "I just wish everyone knew that.''
    Jim and Betty Smith knew. They remember her from the days when they helped the Parkersburg Elks' Club pick the outstanding high school student of 1975 -- Patsy. The couple made pageants a part of their life: he produced them, she chaperoned the state winner, they both acted as judges.
    Dianne Lough was the first Miss West Virginia chaperoned by Betty Smith; Patsy Paugh was the last.
    "She was just crazy about my husband and children,'' Betty Smith said. "She was just very down-to-earth, never thought she was better than anyone else. But she was in some ways more caring. She always thought about the other person.''
    When Betty Smith suffered a stroke in 1985, Patsy flew up from her home in Atlanta with a nightgown and matching housecoat in blue -- Smith's favorite color.
    They didn't see each other again for nine years; Smith wasn't in town when Patsy went to Parkersburg to judge the Miss West Virginia pageant in 1993.
    During that event, Patsy became aware of an uncomfortable swelling in her abdomen. She began consulting doctors, first in West Virginia and finally in Atlanta, where she ended up hospitalized faced with a terrifying and unexpected diagnosis: ovarian cancer.
    Patsy turned to some of her closest friends: Bill and Carole Simpson, Gil and Jayne Kloster.
    "Nobody's telling me what's going on,'' she told Gil. "I'm frightened. Will you come and be with me?''
    Within a day, Patsy underwent a hysterectomy.


    Gil and Jayne Kloster of Atlanta got to know Patsy Ramsey when they suffered a death in the family. "Losing a child and burying a child is about the hardest thing anyone will ever do in their life," Patsy told Jayne.
    Ellen Jaskol/Rocky Mountain News
    "She called me, and she was crying,'' Carole Simpson said. "I stayed with her the night before the surgery. She said, 'I've got to live for my children.' That's all she said, over and over and over.''
    In the debilitating months of chemotherapy that followed, those words became Patsy's mantra. Kloster, a physician, made sure Patsy received the most comprehensive and aggressive treatment possible. He and John made arrangements for her to be part of an experimental cancer program at the National Institutes of Health in Maryland.
    "There were a lot of things going on businesswise, but John just shouldered it,'' Carole Simpson said. "He was very upset at the hospital, you could just see the grief on his face and the concern.''

    In the beginning, John flew with Patsy to the NIH, where she would undergo four days of a super-potent chemo-cocktail. One weekend, John came through Atlanta, and Carole Simpson posed the question that many of her friends wanted answered but were afraid to ask.
    "How bad is it?'' she asked John.
    "It's stage four,'' he said, meaning the cancer had spread to other parts of her body. "It's going to be a tough fight.''
    For months, Patsy would fly from Boulder to Maryland for chemotherapy, then return home only to end up in Boulder Community Hospital with a dangerously low white blood cell count for the next week or two. She would return home and live in a kind of seclusion in the guest room, so sick that her family had to wear surgical masks in her presence to protect her from infection. Burke and JonBenet knew that when her door was closed, Mommy wasn't feeling well.

    "Facing cancer is so difficult, because you are facing your own mortality,'' Patsy said in a December 1994 article in the newsletter, Colorado Woman News. "It's like someone pointing a gun in your face.''
    Her hair fell out. Some days, she could barely talk. Her body wasted away. A deeply spiritual person, Patsy sought strength from her faith, her belief in God.
    She found solace in a small book with a bright yellow cover called Healed of Cancer, whose author had collected biblical passages that spoke of healing. She visualized a beam of light from God enveloping and healing her. She practiced positive affirmations.
    In September 1993, Patsy's friend, the Rev. Rol Hoverstock of St. John's Episcopal Church in Boulder, performed a healing ceremony at her home that ended with Hoverstock giving her a crucifix that had been blessed for her.

    "In my mind, I was healed the day of the healing ceremony,'' Patsy told Colorado Woman News.
    When her close friend, Mary Justice, was diagnosed with cancer in March 1990, Patsy and Carole Simpson organized a "food chain'' among her friends to make sure Justice's family was fed for the month after her first surgery.
    "When I came home from the hospital, there they were, standing in the garage with a nightgown for me," Justice said. "That's the kind of person she is -- always putting somebody else ahead of herself.''
    When Patsy was diagnosed with cancer, it became a special bond between the two women. Now they send each other birthday cards every year on the day they were diagnosed, the day, Justice says, they were both reborn.
    "One time, Patsy came through Atlanta, and several of us went to the airport,'' Justice said. "She had no hair. If you could have seen the expression on her face. She didn't know we'd be out there, and then she saw us at the gate. It was unbelievable. So many tears were cried.''
    John's 50th birthday came during this time. Again, Patsy turned to her friends in Atlanta, who arranged it all. Patsy had to go to Maryland for a cancer treatment that weekend, and when she showed up after John's party, her friends were stunned by how thin she was.


    Mary Justice of Atlanta was diagnosed with cancer in 1990. Patsy Ramsey helped organize a "food chain" to provide meals for Justice's family for a month after her first surgery. "That's the kind of person she is--always putting somebody else ahead of herself," Justice said.
    Ellen Jaskol/Rocky Mountain News
    "I remember hugging her, and thinking she was like a coathanger with a dress hanging on it,'' Carole Simpson said. "That day, it struck me, she was nothing. Like a little bird. It was so sad.
    "I'd talk to her on the phone, and she'd cry and say, 'I just have to make it. I just have to make it. For my children.'''
    Family gathered and helped. Patsy's mother, Nedra Paugh, moved into their Boulder home to take care of everyone, and began making the trips to NIH with Patsy.
    It was a time for intense faith, for optimism, and for random acts of kindness. One of the women undergoing the NIH treatment at the same time as Patsy didn't survive, and her family didn't have money for a funeral.

    "John came forward with the money,'' said his brother, Jeff. "But it's not so much that he did it. It's that nobody knew about it. I even heard it secondhand. I had to ask him if it was true.''
    In 1994, Patsy learned that Linda McLean's husband, Jim, had been diagnosed with terminal stomach cancer. She flew to West Virgina and showed up at their home without her wig, even though her hair was only beginning to grow back.
    "She showed him that she had survived and gave him hope that he, too, could conquer it,'' McLean said. Patsy sent cards and letters and a box of inspirational books. "She was our light to keep going.''
    Jim McLean died in March 1995. "But because of Patsy he never gave up hope,'' Linda McLean said. "She loved Jim, and he loved her, and I love her, because she is as good a person as I have ever known.''
    If you ask Patsy Ramsey whether she believes in angels, she will say she does. She believed that John's daughter, Beth, became her guardian angel after her death, and helped Patsy survive her cancer. She was convinced the day she underwent a scan to determine if the chemotherapy had successfully eradicated her cancer.
    ''Beth, if you are there, please help me get through this,'' Patsy silently prayed. She told Colorado Woman News that something amazing happened then:
    "Suddenly, over my right shoulder, a young woman appeared. She looked exactly like Beth: same hairstyle, same hair color, same lipstick, everything! She said to me, 'My name is Bethany, and I will be running your CAT scan.' I never saw her before at the center, and I never saw her since.''
    The CAT scan was negative. It was a second chance.
    "They lost a lot of time together when she was so ill,'' said Patsy's friend, Dianne Lough. "I know she wanted to make every day count.''
    Their friends and children describe the Ramseys as loving parents.
    John and Cindy's kids, Beth, Melinda and John Andrew, all loved Patsy. John Andrew still remembers how she helped him with his fourth-grade project on the state of Virginia by cutting out Virginias from cardboard for his report. She held a luncheon at their country club in honor of Melinda's debut, and spent hours making the topiary centerpieces for each table.
    "She loved those kids just as much as she loved Burke,'' said Shirley Brady, who had been Burke's nanny and later baby-sat JonBenet. "She was so good to them. And they adored her.''

    John and Cindy divorced when their children were young; John Andrew was still a toddler. But wherever John's business took him, he called them every day.
    "Every night, 7 o'clock, that was Dad,'' John Andrew said. They would see him every weekend, and calls from his kids always took priority at work. "I was always more important than any meeting,'' his son said.
    "There couldn't be any better parents,'' said Irene Wills, John's former mother-in-law and stepmother. "I think John realized, especially after Beth's death, how much they mean to him.''
    The Ramseys' friend, Jay Elowsky, saw the family frequently at his Pasta Jay's restaurants and was impressed by the couple's patience with Burke and JonBenet.


    A photo of Patsy Paugh Ramsey as Miss West Virginia of 1977 hangs on the wall of Colombo's Restaurant in Parkersburg, her home town. It was in 1993, when she went back to judge the Miss West Virginia pageant that she noticed the first symptoms of ovarian cancer.
    Ellen Jaskol/Rocky Mountain News
    "I was talking to John about that, because he's an older father. He said, 'I'm really digging fatherhood the second time around. I've got the time, I've learned, I'm really having a lot more fun with it.' ''
    Patsy's dedication to children began long before she had her own, friends say. She and Carole Simpson spent more than a year refining and expanding a Christmas card fund-raising project to benefit Eggleston Children's Hospital in Atlanta, taking it from $15,000 in earnings to more than $80,000.

    "If a child was sick in the neighborhood, Patsy would be making cupcakes and delivering them,'' Jayne Kloster said.
    For years, the Ramseys, the Klosters and several other couples had made an annual outing to North Carolina. Patsy's cancer kept the Ramseys away for a couple of years, but they were back again last October, full of optimism and hope for the future.
    During that trip, Patsy pulled out photos of JonBenet in her first beauty pageant. "That's the first any of us ever knew about that,'' Gil Kloster said.
    It was, say all the people who knew, such a small part of JonBenet's life, a part that has taken on a life of its own with her death.
    The JonBenet they knew was the one trying to keep up with her big brother, Burke. "She was a tomboy with scrapes on her knees, just like any 6-year-old,'' John Andrew Ramsey said.

    The foray into pageants, which began in earnest in 1996, was a way for Patsy and JonBenet to be closer. Because of Patsy's cancer, they had to make up for lost time.
    "It's just mother-daughter time,'' said Tammy Polson, who became friends with Patsy when their daughters competed at pageants together. "It's something you can share together.''
    The expensive, custom-made dresses and costumes were part of Patsy's desire to do things exactly right. She even discussed the idea of making extra dresses to bring to pageants and share with other little girls, even if they were competing against JonBenet. And she wanted them to be as elaborate and beautiful as her daughter's.
    "She never did anything halfway. I think ever since she had cancer, her intensity has increased,'' Dianne Lough said. "Do the best she could with everything she did. Because she didn't know how long she'd be around.''
    Pageantry had been good to Patsy, and she believed it would be good for JonBenet, a way to learn poise and self-confidence and to provide an outlet for her daughter's love of performing.
    "She is just so easy and so gentle, and she had so many good things to teach her child,'' said Pamela Griffin, who designed most of JonBenet's pageant costumes. "If JonBenet did not win a pageant, she was always the first one in line to congratulate the winner, always the gracious loser. If she won -- and when she won, she won big -- she'd be standing there with five or six trophies and a dozen crowns, and she'd immediately go give them to some of the little girls who didn't win.


    Musician Shirley Brady of Americus, Ga., was a nanny for Burke Ramsey and later was a babysitter for JonBenet. She wrote a song for JonBenet after the girl was killed.
    Patrick Davison/Rocky Mountain News

    "Patsy always taught that kind of graciousness.''
    It was the same spirit that infused the Ramseys' entertaining, something they both loved. Their parties were elaborate and meticulously planned, down to the tiniest detail.
    Their Christmas party was an annual event, and 1996 was no different. As always, Santa Claus was there to read stories to the children. The party, two days before Christmas, was just one event on their jam-packed holiday calendar. There was a trip to their Charlevoix, Mich., vacation home right after Christmas, and then on to the Disney Big Red Boat to celebrate Patsy's 40th birthday on Dec. 29. The Little Miss Hawaiian Tropic pageant was on JonBenet's agenda for the first of the year.
    The family's schedule was so hectic, in fact, that it was Christmas Eve before Patsy was able to mail out the bundles of cards she sent each year, complete with photo, family letter and personal note.
    Fourth-grader Burke really shines in math and spelling, she wrote. Kindergartener JonBenet has already been promoted to first-grade math. "Her teacher says she is so outgoing that she will never have trouble delivering an oral book report!''
    The day after Christmas, the cards arrived.
    And then the calls came: JonBenet was dead.
    "I had not finished reading that note Patsy enclosed with that picture an hour earlier,'' Mary Justice said. "It was just real bizarre. Real bizarre.''
    John Andrew and Melinda had flown from their mother's Atlanta home to Minneapolis, where the rest of the family planned to meet for the trip to Michigan. A message was waiting for them: call Boulder.
    "I had this gut feeling -- I've been through this before -- that something was wrong,'' John Andrew said. "I called home, and my Dad said JonBenet had been kidnapped. At that point, they had found the ransom note.''
    Immediately, they boarded a plane to Denver. "I yelled and I kicked and I screamed, and they put us on the next flight out,'' John Andrew said.
    They arrived in Boulder just after their father found JonBenet's body in the basement.


    Patsy Ramsey holds a poster the Ramseys had printed offering a $100,000 reward for information in the slaying of JonBenet. Patsey also sent a letter to members of her childhood church congregation: "We miss her very much. I cry myself to sleep every night."
    Patrick Davison/Rocky Mountain News
    Carole Simpson already had heard the news when Patsy called on Dec. 27. "She was just sobbing. She said, 'I can't believe someone did this to my baby! Someone came into my house and murdered my baby!' She just kept repeating that, over and over and over.''

    Immediately, the Ramseys' family of friends mobilized. When John and Patsy returned to Atlanta to bury JonBenet, they would stay with them in shifts, around the clock.
    About 20 friends and relatives met their plane in Atlanta.
    "I had never seen people with broken hearts,'' Mary Justice said of the Ramseys. "There were no words to describe it.''
    They buried JonBenet on the last day of the year in an unmarked grave in St. James Episcopal Cemetery, another child interred in the winter's ground. Surrounded by masses of flowers, like Beth before her.
    Even at the funeral, John Andrew had to put himself between photographers and Burke. It was only the beginning.
    Back in Boulder, the Ramseys moved out of their house and in with friends to escape reporters and photographers. They spent the six weeks after the funeral with Jay Elowsky, who had to steel himself each time he returned to them.
    "It was a very tragic, very heavy environment. I would have done anything in the world to take that suffering away from them.'' Instead, Elowsky found himself swinging at paparazzi with a baseball bat.
    John and Patsy, out in Atlanta on an errand, saw a photographer pull up next to them and try to take their picture. "Pull into the drive-through at the bank and have the teller call the police,'' Patsy told John.
    When they pulled into the bank, the photographer jumped out of his car, ran over to the Ramseys and pushed a camera in John's face.
    "Why did you kill your daughter?'' he screamed, snapping pictures.
    "Of course it upsets me,'' Melinda Ramsey said of all the negative publicity, of being chased during her vacation by obscenity-spewing photographers from supermarket tabloids. "But I know my Dad better than anybody else. I've known him for 25 years. And I know he could not have done this at all. To me, it is just so shocking that anyone could believe they've done this. It's just beyond belief.''
    Her little sister, JonBenet Patricia Ramsey, would have turned 7 this month.
    So much has changed.
    John Andrew, alone now in Boulder, always looks over his shoulder when he goes out. The Ramseys have moved back to Atlanta, a place where they feel at home.
    Still, there will be no unlocked doors. Their new home has state-of-the-art security. They have hired guards to keep them safe from prying cameras and reporters.
    "I'm tired of waiting for the system to work, because it's not working,'' Jeff Ramsey said. "I'm tired of hearing all these innuendos. Somebody out there murdered a member of this family. It's not John or Patsy. So whoever did it is still out there.''
    "The most important thing is to find whoever did this. So this can't happen again,'' Melinda Ramsey said. "It may take years, but this person will be found.''
    John and Patsy, their friends say, take it day by day.

    "When I came home from the hospital, there they were standing in the garage with a nightgown for me,'' Justice sai "We miss her very much,'' Patsy wrote of JonBenet in a letter thanking people at her childhood church in Parkersburg for keeping them on the prayer list. "I cry myself to sleep every night.''
    "They are trying to get their lives back as best they can,'' Jayne Kloster said. "Patsy still has fear because she doesn't know who did it. Someone asked her if she had reached the angry stage yet, and she said, 'I'm still living in fear. I don't know who to be angry at, because I don't know who did this.' She's still looking over her shoulder, not knowing who's out there.''


    A stuffed bunny and flowers decorate the grave of JonBenet in Marietta, Ga. On Aug. 6, the slain beauty queen would have been 7.
    Laura Noel/ Special to the News
    Could they have done it?

    No, say the Ramseys. No, say their family. No, say their friends.
    "I have to be perfectly honest, I had to stop and ask myself that question,'' Carole Simpson said. "I honestly can say it didn't make any sense to me that they had done it. You can't feign that kind of innocence. You can't make that up. I know the kind of people they are. I've seen them with their children.''
    "Certainly, everyone wants an answer,'' Gil Kloster said. "My concern is, (what if) they never know? They not only have to deal with the loss, they're also suspects. It's a living hell.''
    There may never be an answer to what happened to JonBenet. Many people will always suspect the Ramseys. Their friends and family say they never will.
    "The (public) doesn't know them. And the public is accustomed to being betrayed. Look at Susan Smith,'' Gil Kloster said, referring to the young mother who made up a kidnapping story to conceal the fact she had murdered her two young sons.
    "This poor, grieving mother, so distraught. Susan Smith was pretty convincing. For a few days, Susan Smith was a sympathetic person.
    "If John and Patsy had anything to do with this, they would make Susan Smith look like a kindergartener.''

    August 17, 1997


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    'Such good people'
    Friends describe JonBenet's parents as kind, generous and devoted to their family
    By Lynn Bartels


    %%byline%%By Lynn Bartels
    Rocky Mountain News Staff Writer


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Shirley Bradley needed a job in the worst way.
    The aging nanny was out of work and had nowhere to live. She turned in desperation to John and Patricia "Patsy'' Ramsey.
    And even though their first child wasn't due until four months later, Bradley started working for the Ramseys the next day.
    It's that good-hearted generosity that makes it hard for friends of John and Patsy Ramsey to connect them with the horror discovered in the basement of their luxurious Boulder home the day after Christmas.
    The body of JonBenet, their beautiful, precocious 6-year-old daughter, lay in a little-used room behind a door that had been jammed shut.
    The kindergarten beauty princess had been sexually violated and strangled.
    No one has been ruled out as a suspect, not even John and Patsy Ramsey.
    And that riles their friends.
    "I'm so heartsick,'' said Nancy Turner Lawton, who dated John Ramsey in high school and college. "He is a kind and a good man and for this to happen to him makes me sick.''

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    John Ramsey's high school friends from Okemos, Mich., remember their classmate as extremely quiet.
    They also recall that his ears stuck out so far it was easy to pick him out of a group photograph.
    He brought his beautiful young wife, Patsy, to his 25-year high school reunion. Almost a decade later while having dinner with one of the groomsmen from his first marriage, Ramsey offered to pay for the 35-year reunion.
    Lawton started dating Ramsey during their senior year in 1960-1961.
    She often spent weekends with the Ramsey family -- James "Jay'' Ramsey, his wife, Mary Jane Bennett Ramsey, and sons John and Jeff -- at their summer cottage in Michigan.
    She described them as a "reserved'' family of modest means.
    Ramsey's father passed his love of flying, boating and golfing to his oldest son.
    Jay Ramsey, a decorated World War II pilot who grew up in Omaha, Neb., was head of the Michigan Aeronautics Commission until he retired in 1979.
    "They used to call him Czar Ramsey at the airport,'' neighbor Ethelwynne Gibson recalled with a laugh. "He really ran things.''
    After high school, John Ramsey attended Michigan State University, where Lawton eventually enrolled. They dated three and a half years before deciding to see other people.
    One day in art class, Lawton mentioned the breakup, and classmate Lucinda "Cindy'' Lou Pasch piped up.
    "She said, 'I don't think you better say anything else. John asked me out this weekend,''' Lawton recalled. "It was just an unbelievable coincidence.''
    Lawton cherishes the relationship she had with John Ramsey, with whom she has kept in touch.
    Years later, their daughters were sorority sisters at Kappa Alpha Theta at the University of Miami in Oxford, Ohio.
    "He was a quality kind of person, and everything in my relationship with him proved that to be true,'' Lawton said. "He was a complete gentleman.''

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    John Ramsey was president of Theta Chi fraternity. Cindy Lou Pasch was a Delta Gamma. They announced their engagement in December 1965.
    They graduated the next June, John with a degree in electrical engineering and Cindy with a degree in elementary education. They were married the next month in Pasch's hometown in Kalamazoo, Mich.
    Ramsey -- a member of ROTC during school -- became a naval officer and spent two years in the Philippines before getting his master's degree in marketing from MSU in 1971.
    The family moved to Atlanta in 1973, where Ramsey had accepted a sales job with a California-based computer electronics engineering company.
    John and Cindy Ramsey separated in 1977 and divorced the next year. Cindy Ramsey got the house, the 1977 Oldsmobile Cutlass station wagon and custody of their children: Elizabeth, 8; Melinda, 6; and John Andrew, 11/2. John Ramsey got the 1969 Oldsmobile, the tape deck and generous visitation.
    Cindy Ramsey, who has since remarried, has declined requests for interviews, as have their children.
    Friends say John Ramsey was single for at least a year before he saw a stunning woman enter an apartment complex in Atlanta.
    She was Patricia Ann Paugh, Miss West Virginia 1977, who won a talent award at the Miss American pageant for a dramatic reading she wrote herself.
    "He ran (up) a flight of steps to try to see who she was, and she disappeared. But he eventually found her,'' Patsy Ramsey's mother, Nedra Paugh, told the Boulder Daily Camera.
    Ramsey married Paugh in 1980 at the Peachtree Presbyterian Church near Atlanta. He was 37, she was 23.
    For much of the 1980s, the Ramseys lived just north of Atlanta on a quiet street that dead-ends into a wooded glade near the Chatahoochie recreation area.
    It was from the basement of this home that John Ramsey ran the fledgling computer company that would later become Access Graphics, and would make him a millionaire.
    "He had a lot of vision,'' said next-door neighbor Joe Saportas, a computer consultant.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Patsy Ramsey became pregnant with their first child six years after they married.
    That same year, nanny Shirley Brady found herself out of a job when two elderly women she had been working for had to go to a nursinghome.
    In desperation, she turned to the Peachtree Presbyterian Church and was referred to the Ramseys.
    When she explained her predicament to John Ramsey, he hired her on the spot, although the baby wasn't due for several months. He remodeled their home to make an apartment for her next to the nursery.
    "That's the kind of people they are,'' said Brady, who is 69 and lives in a retirement home in Americus, Ga.
    Brady heard the couple leave for the hospital when Patsy Ramsey went into labor.
    "The next morning Mr. Ramsey came dragging his feet up the stairs,'' she said. "He said, 'Well, we have a boy.' He was delirious. He was so happy.''
    Burke Hamilton Ramsey was born Jan. 27, 1987.
    John Ramsey told Brady he chose the name after dreaming about a man in a long, white robe with a book in his hand. That man said the child should be named Burke Hamilton.
    Brady said John Ramsey's children from his first marriage were frequently at the home.
    "They loved their daddy. And they were such well-behaved children and such high class. Their father dropped everything for the children,'' she said.
    Brady only worked for the Ramseys for two years, but she kept in touch and shared Patsy Ramsey's excitement when daugher JonBenet -- a French derivative for her father's name, John Bennett -- was born Aug. 6, 1990.
    "Patsy told me she was beautiful, but oh, I couldn't believe it when I saw her. JonBenet looked like a big doll with those long eyelashes,'' Brady said.
    Neighbors Vesta and Charles Taylor considered themselves an extra set of grandparents to Burke and JonBenet, and visted often with the Ramseys.
    "They just lived for those kids,'' Vesta Taylor said.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Ramseys moved to Boulder in 1991 after his company merged with Boulder-based Access Graphics and another firm.
    Patsy Ramsey was initially disappointed to leave her family, her friends in Junior League and the gardening club and her newly renovated home.
    "She had just finished the back porch, and it looked like an Arabian tent,'' Brady said.
    "But she would do anything for her husband. She was very proud that Mr. Ramsey was made president of the company.''
    The Ramseys bought a 15-room mansion near Chautauqua Park that has been remodeled over the years.
    While John Ramsey traveled extensively for his business, Patsy Ramsey threw herself into her son's school activities, planned lavish parties for their friends and busied herself with the renovation of the vacation home they had purchased in Charlevoix, Mich.
    And Patsy Ramsey instilled her passion for beauty pageants in JonBenet. The two had become a fixture on the pageant tour. JonBenet wore elaborate costumes, sophisticated makeup and dazzled judges with her presentations, all under her mother's tutelage.
    But tragedy hit the Ramseys in 1992.
    John Ramsey's oldest daughter, 22-year-old Elizabeth Ramsey, and her boyfriend Matthew Derrington were killed in a traffic accident near Chicago when their car hit a bakery truck. The roads were slick, the Illinois State Patrol reported.
    And Patsy Ramsey discovered she had ovarian cancer. Her husband insisted she receive the best treatment possible, and she was seen by cancer specialists in Bethesda, Md.
    Her battle must have brought back horrible memories for John Ramsey.
    His mother died of cancer when he was in his late 20s. Years later, John Ramsey's father, Jay Ramsey, married his first wife's mother, Irene Pasch, after her husband died. Jay Ramsey died in 1992 and Irene Ramsey has since remarried.
    "We are grieving,'' is all Irene Wells of Sun City Center, Fla., has said since her step granddaughter's murder.
    Shirley Brady called Patsy Ramsey on Christmas, the day before JonBenet was murdered. Patsy Ramsey was upbeat and excited.
    She would turn 40 that Sunday. She had beaten the cancer. The family was leaving for Charlevoix for the New Year holiday.
    And JonBenet was competing in the Little Miss Hawaiian Tropic beauty contest on Jan. 5 in Colorado.
    "It's funny how you can get so attached to people who are so good and loving,'' Brady said. "They were such good people. Never a harsh word. Kind expressions to one another.
    "I tell you, when I was looking down at the little girl in that coffin all these things come back in my mind,'' she said.
    "There is no chance at them being guilty.''
    Librarian Carol Kasel provided research, and staff writers Lisa Levitt Ryckman and John C. Ensslin contributed to this report.


    January 12, 1997



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    John Ramsey brief speech at University of Alabama.

    http://media.www.cw.ua.edu/media/sto...-3288679.shtml


    John Ramsey speaks about late daughter
    Ramsey said he is happy with memories he has of JonBenet
    Jennie Kushner
    Contributing Writer
    Issue date: 3/28/08 Section: Web Exclusive Stories
    PrintEmail Article Tools Page 1 of 2 next > John Ramsey, father of the late JonBenet, spoke to a crowd last night in the Biology Building about his innocence in the killing of his daughter in 1996.
    Six-year-old beauty queen JonBenet Ramsey was found dead in her parents' basement in Boulder, Colo., on Christmas day after her parents John and Patsy found a ransom note earlier that morning.

    John Ramsey, once a suspect, along with his wife, started out his hour-long speech with his previous experiences in the media and the memory of his older daughter who was killed in a car accident.

    Ramsey said after his life was back on track from the loss of his oldest daughter, the tragic loss of JonBenet put his family on a rollercoaster ride for the next decade.

    "The worst moment of my life was when she was missing, but once she was found, it made me feel better because at least I knew where she was," Ramsey said.

    Ramsey said the investigation conducted by the police in Boulder accusing him and his wife was done poorly.

    "The police always look for parents when a child is endangered or worse," Ramsey said.

    He also said the media played a role in the horrible situation his family was enduring.

    The tabloid media got involved, and they found out that by sensationalizing the news, it's easier to sell more papers, Ramsey said, so they started writing stories and finally the mainstream media picked up from that and just blew it out of the water.

    "We've allowed the media to turn the justice system into entertainment," Ramsey said.

    After further conversation about the logistics of the case, Ramsey shifted the focus of his speech toward strategies on how to deal with tragedy and loss.

    "I think it's good to have someone like this come and speak to us because he has become a well known figure in society and it's always good to know how people like that deal with tragedy," said Jeanna Courter, a freshman majoring in pre-law.

    By making light in dark situations, Ramsey said he personally used humor, sleep, faith, memories and looking toward the future to keep from severe depression.

    "Life's not easy, it's a marathon with lots of hills," Ramsey said.

    Using many quotes in his speech, including one from the Garth Brooks song, "The Dance," Ramsey said he was happy with the six years he spent with his late daughter, and said he would much rather have those memories and deal with the struggle of this still unsolved case than have not had time with his daughter at all.

    "Having him come and speak really opened up my eyes to see that life really does throw curve balls at you, and you have to learn how to adjust and deal with it," said Erin Condara, a freshman majoring in nursing.

    "Although I still wonder who the true killer was, it takes a strong person to come to a major university and speak about something like that, so I have to give the man props," said Molly Cole, a freshman majoring in communications.

    Ramsey ended his speech by opening up the floor for a question and answer session and left the crowd with one last thought.

    "We as humans have the ability to bounce back, and sometimes that's just what we have to do," he said.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Last edited by koldkase; September 9, 2008, 1:33 pm at Tue Sep 9 13:33:45 UTC 2008.

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

    ~~~~~~~
    Bloomies underwear model:
    3 Dimensional

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    My opinions, nothing more.

  2. #2
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    "When I came home from the hospital, there they were, standing in the garage with a nightgown for me," Justice said. "That's the kind of person she is -- always putting somebody else ahead of herself.''

    See that line right there? There you have one of the most significant bricks in the wall of guilt that can be seen on a character-testimony basis against Patsy. For on the morning of December 26th, Patricia Ann Ramsey, for seemingly the first time in her life, put herself before the single person who truly needed to be put first -- JonBenet. That act should speak volumes to anyone who requires proof of how Patsy could change overnight into a person capable of dealing out death. She did change. Even to people who thought her the very soul of innocence, they should admit that the Patsy Ramsey of December 26th, 1996 was not the Patsy Ramsey of the days before, and that includes especially the Patsy Ramsey who supposedly thought she would be getting JonBenet back from a kidnapper soon. That Patsy was not putting JonBenet ahead of herself, that Patsy was doing nothing to help assemble the ransom or answer the phones or even help control the very friends she herself turned into an uncontrollable, panicked herd.

    The light bulb pops up even brighter over my head upon having this article refresh my perspective. I find in it the seeds of the reason why Fleet in particular was brought over to the house. As John Ramsey had said in his 1998 investigative interview, he had already known Fleet to be a man prone to easy panic and rash emotion. Surely John told Patsy about the anecdote involving the near-crash of John's boat into a Charlevoix marina wall, if Patsy herself had not been witness to it. If Patsy was guilty of JonBenet's death, and wanted to muddy up the crime scene more than it already had been, she had to have stored in her encyclopedic knowledge of her friends that Fleet would be a perfect patsy, so to speak, because he could be counted on to become emotional and in doing so also become a forensic contaminant beyond compare.

    (This might also explain why the Stines were not called, even though they lived closer than all the other Ramsey friends. As we have seen for ourselves, Susan Stine can be an awfully cool cucumber, and the last thing Patsy needed on that morning would have been a person actually capable of keeping her head and wits about her and possibly picking up on clues which would then point right back at Patsy.)

  3. #3

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    Yes, Why Nut, you have put your finger on the personal testimony Patsy's friends gave of her character that I find most intriguing. And you have expressed it right on point, as well.

    I really believe that Patsy Ramsey was always the woman capable of ice cold action when it served her goals. I think she was the consummate actor, her skills honed in practicing her dramatic interpretation, with which she won state and national awards in high school and at the Miss American competition.

    This really stuck out for me, from the first article: the "gathering" of family and friends in a "crisis" situation, when Beth died. Sound familiar?

    For Patsy, it was a time to watch over John, to make sure that everything was handled for him. The night before Beth's funeral, Patsy called some of their friends and asked them to come to a gathering at Cindy's house to support John.
    "She thought of things like that,'' Carole Simpson said. "When we got there, we realized she had read the situation perfectly.
    Cindy's brothers and sisters were there. Her friends were there. It was her house. It was an awkward situation. He appreciated the fact that we came.''

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

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    3 Dimensional

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  4. #4

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    This is an excerpt from Patsy's second interview with LE, the one with Tom Haney in Boulder, arranged by DA Hunter's Office and with his detectives as interrogators, not BPD detectives. Notice here, in her '98 interview with Haney, how Patsy pauses at times. When she changes something AFTER a pause--like the pronoun "we" becomes "I"--or her words/explanations following her pauses are disconnected and disjointed, or she "OVER EXPLAINS" what follows, she's hiding something or lying, trying to conceal something and afraid she's revealed something incriminating, gotten off "script" or slipped up.

    Mike Kane said Patsy appeared to him to be less than forthcoming in her interviews. This is why: professional investigators have years of experience and training with people trying to "get their stories straight". If Patsy was working that hard to make sure she didn't "slip up", then she was hiding something. What parent does that in the investigation of her child's brutal murder?


    11 TOM HANEY: Just wherever you want

    12 to start right now. Like I said, we have tons

    13 of questions, but I want to give you this

    14 opportunity early on to tell the -- what you

    15 know about it.

    16 PATSY RAMSEY: Well, all I know is

    17 that her father and I put her to bed. The night

    18 of Christmas day, 25th. And that was the last

    19 time I saw her until the afternoon of the 26th,

    20 when John discovered her body in the basement

    21 and we had -- I had found the note which said

    22 that it was a kidnapping. [Which was it, Patsy? It seems important to YOU that you get this right.]

    23 So that morning we were all

    24 operating under the presumption of the facts of

    25 a kidnapping. Fact that it was a kidnapping.
    [This is very technical language for a parent describing her reaction to discovering terrorists had not only kidnapped her child, but knowing now "they" had in fact murdered the child. This is the result of many hours spent discussing the murder with lawyers and investigators of their OWN, or coaching, or both.]

    0007

    1 The police were there and they were setting up

    2 telephones and all that. They were trying to

    3 obtain the ransom money and all that kind of

    4 stuff. And then we found out otherwise. [I'd like to see Patsy's body language here. Fat chance, since the RST controls these tapes.]

    5 TOM HANEY: What I would like to do

    6 now is just kind of walk you through diagrams of

    7 the house, and it's going to be a little bit

    8 tricky here, but first of all, if you just take

    9 a minute and look. This is of the third floor,

    10 floor plan. It's -- I don't know if it's

    11 approximately to scale. If you just look it

    12 over.

    13 PATSY RAMSEY: Okay.

    [snipping out Haney's "walkthrough" with Patsy of the floorplan of the house, which she refers back to in the following dialogue]

    8 TOM HANEY: What I would like to do

    9 then is just have you walk us through and maybe

    10 first of all, just in your own words again, if

    11 you could tell us from the time that you got up

    12 on the 26th of December, what you did and what

    13 happened on that, after you go through it all

    14 once and we will come back again and that's when

    15 I would like you to mark on here, we will trace

    16 your path, your route, what you did and the last

    17 additional questions then, okay?

    18 PATSY RAMSEY: Okay. I awakened

    19 that morning, probably somewhere between 5:30

    20 and 6. We are going to take off for the airport

    21 just at 7, we were going to the lake house. I

    22 got up and walked over here to my bathroom right

    23 in here.

    24 TRIP DeMUTH: I am sorry, I missed

    25 what you said, what time you said.

    0009

    1 PATSY RAMSEY: Sometime

    2 between 5:30 and 6 a.m. And walked around

    3 here to the bathroom and I did not take a shower

    4 that morning, so I don't know, you know, what

    5 exactly I did here. I mean other than just get

    6 dressed, brush my teeth, put on my make up. And

    7 get ready to go.

    8 And then I walked down downstairs

    9 here, came to the landing there (showing

    10 document) and there was an ironing board here,

    11 some clothes, I had a plastic bag kind of right

    12 in here somewhere that I had just things to

    13 throw, throw in, to take for my trip. And I

    14 think I was here for a couple of minutes, just

    15 getting some clothes, things.

    16 And then I started down the stairs,

    17 this staircase, to go to the kitchen. And the

    18 note was on the landing, on the stairs, the

    19 bottom of the stairs here. And I, there was

    20 some lighting on, but it wasn't bright lights

    21 (INAUDIBLE) and looked -- you know, started

    22 reading the letter.
    [She stops her flow of thought after "And I"...pause...changes to "there was some lighting", describes the lighting...pauses...adds "you know" as she interrupts her speech and thought flow several times.]

    23 And after the first couple of

    24 sentences realized,
    you know, what was

    25 happening, and I ran back up these stairs, okay,

    0010

    1 and pushed her door to her room right here, and

    2 she was not in her bed. So I went over to these

    3 stairs and yelled out for John, called to him

    4 and he came down. And I said "she's been

    5 kidnapped, here's a note," whatever.
    ["...WHATEVER." Odd undermining of the gravity of the situation, as well as a convenient dismissal of "details" with which she knows she is struggling.]

    [Notice the rest of her "story" has many pauses, time stalling phrases like "you know", and is disjointed with some non sequiturs started and then abandoned without any clarification, etc.]

    And I was

    6 panicking, you know. I think -- I can't

    7 remember
    exactly what I did then, whether -- I

    8 think
    I ran downstairs again.

    9 I said, you know, "what do we do,

    10 what do we do?"

    11 He said, "call 911, call the

    12 police."

    13 I ran upstairs, and I think -- I

    14 think -- I -- I can't remember if -- I think


    15 asked him to check on Burke, one of us checked

    16 on Burke, and I remember just seeing him at the

    17 phone, trying to -- and then I looked down and

    18 John came down and on the floor, down here


    19 (indicating), [COLOR="Red"]I came in here, here, and John

    20 came down, I went to the telephone here, and he

    21 kind of crouched on the floor, he was in his

    22 underwear, and read the papers on the floor

    23 right there, and you know, I was trying to get

    24 this 911 person to -- it just seemed like it

    25 took forever, to drag through, you know, crazy

    0011

    1 by that time.

    2 Anyway, got the message across,
    [personal pronoun "I" again left out]

    she

    3 said she would send somebody out, and oh, God in

    4 heaven. Oh,then I phone -- called our friends,
    [Patsy has displayed a lot of emotion retelling her story up to this point. Finally here she stopped her flow to change phrases. Why? There is no difference between phoning friends and calling them...so what did she see in her mind here that stopped her? Isn't this where the enhanced 911 call tape reveals a conversation taking place near the phone, viciously denied by the Ramseys? "Help me Jesus"? "What did you find/do?"? What happened between Patsy talking with 911 and her phoning her friends that crossed her mind here?]

    [Now notice the flow of her ideas changes here.]

    5 Mr. and Mrs. Fleet White and Mr. and

    6 Mrs. Johnson, they live in Boulder. I think

    7 John went back up to get dressed.

    8 And I called them and told them

    9 that she's been kidnapped, she is missing. And

    10 then I walked out through here, and opened the

    11 door, and started waiting for -- front door -- [This was probably just clarification on the floorplans she's been following for Haney.]

    12 started waiting for the police to show up.

    13 (INAUDIBLE).

    14 I was standing on the (INAUDIBLE)

    15 and pretty soon a squad car came -- you know,

    16 officer came up. And I remember thinking

    17 because it said somewhere in the note, if you do

    18 that, if you call somebody, that's not good.

    19 Blah, blah, blah. [Very inappropriate, an insensitive and flippant attitude from the mother of a murdered child in her second LE interview in 18 months to further finding the killer of her child, isn't it? Almost as if she has related and discussed this story so many times before--only not with LE--that she's become desensitized to the fact that the "killer" actually said "he" would BEHEAD the child...and did murder her.]

    [Notice how the rest of her story is broken phrases, though it sounds authentic, as if she is telling some version of the truth. Consider, if you believe Patsy wrote the note, that Patsy was actually thinking SHE HOPED LE WASN'T WATCHING HER, that what rattled her was LE, not a non-existent intruder.]

    And I just remembered

    20 thinking oh, my God, I hope they are not

    21 watching me. I mean, what if they are watching,

    22 if the policeman comes, I mean all this was just

    23 rushing through my head.

    24 Anyway, he came in and -- and I was

    25 just rattled.
    I think John came in, and I think

    0012

    1 he kind of walked us over to this sun room area,

    2 and tried to -- tried to calm us down and, you

    3 know, tried to explain what happened. And then

    4 they kind of took over.
    You know, when looking at Patsy's telling of this story, she seems to lose her composure the most when "John" is present in the scene. Am I imagining that?

    Also, she seems to know a lot about what the ransom note threatened by the point she's waiting at the door for LE, when she in fact said more than once she didn't read the note in full before she called LE. She has never said in any telling of the story, to my knowledge, she read the ransom note in full before LE arrived.

    Well, that's more time than I meant to spend on this. And more than most will spend looking at it. I simply will always be in awe of how many people it took to make excuses for Patsy Ramsey to keep her out of court on charges involving the murder of JonBenet.

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
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  5. #5
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    "She was doing well, she was happy, she was pretty."

    Here again, we see the vanity, the inappropriate focus on looks. Who cares if Beth had been "pretty?" Why do these people care so much about appearances?? Shallow, stupid, vain.

    "Trusting people, who left the side door unlocked in Boulder so their children's friends could come and go."


    So why did John have to break the basement window to get into the house that day...???

    "Patsy shared that lack of pretention. Even her closest friends knew her for years before learning she had been Miss West Virginia..."


    Really??? Patsy??? You must be thinking of some other Patsy.


    "During that event, Patsy became aware of an uncomfortable swelling in her abdomen. She began consulting doctors, first in West Virginia and finally in Atlanta, where she ended up hospitalized faced with a terrifying and unexpected diagnosis: ovarian cancer.
    Patsy turned to some of her closest friends: Bill and Carole Simpson, Gil and Jayne Kloster.
    "Nobody's telling me what's going on,'' she told Gil. "I'm frightened. Will you come and be with me?''
    Within a day, Patsy underwent a hysterectomy.

    Gil and Jayne Kloster of Atlanta got to know Patsy Ramsey when they suffered a death in the family. "Losing a child and burying a child is about the hardest thing anyone will ever do in their life," Patsy told Jayne.

    "She called me, and she was crying,'' Carole Simpson said. "I stayed with her the night before the surgery. She said, 'I've got to live for my children.' That's all she said, over and over and over.''


    You notice there is no mention of John in this section. Where was John when his wife was undergoing major surgery?


    "It was a time for intense faith, for optimism, and for random acts of kindness. One of the women undergoing the NIH treatment at the same time as Patsy didn't survive, and her family didn't have money for a funeral.

    "John came forward with the money,'' said his brother, Jeff. "But it's not so much that he did it. It's that nobody knew about it. I even heard it secondhand. I had to ask him if it was true.'' "



    Yet John threw his closest friends, the Whites, in front of law enforcement as suspects for JonBenet's murder. He had no qualms about that. He also cast suspicion on their housekeeper, the son of the neighbor across the street, and anyone else he could think of to keep the focus off of himself and Patsy. Touching, John, very touching.



    "Brady only worked for the Ramseys for two years, but she kept in touch and shared Patsy Ramsey's excitement when daugher JonBenet -- a French derivative for her father's name, John Bennett -- was born Aug. 6, 1990."

    This is not a "French derivative." It is nothing French except pretension, and naming a girl with both of her father's names stuck together is pretty sick.


    "And Patsy Ramsey instilled her passion for beauty pageants in JonBenet. The two had become a fixture on the pageant tour. JonBenet wore elaborate costumes, sophisticated makeup and dazzled judges with her presentations, all under her mother's tutelage."


    Woops. Wasn't it supposed to have been JonBenet's interest in pageants that got Patsy interested again?? Big slip there.



    "The worst moment of my life was when she was missing, but once she was found, it made me feel better because at least I knew where she was," Ramsey said."


    There you go. There's John Ramsey all over - he feels better that his daughter is no longer missing and hopefully alive, but is confirmed dead. Way to go John!!



    "By making light in dark situations, Ramsey said he personally used humor, sleep, faith, memories and looking toward the future to keep from severe depression.

    "Life's not easy, it's a marathon with lots of hills," Ramsey said."


    A little too glib, John. JonBenet was just one of those hills to you, eh? What humor can you have when your 6-year-old innocent yet not virginal daughter has been murdered? Riddle me that, you sick narcissistic jerk.
    "We're not necessarily doubting that God will do the best for us; we are wondering how painful the best will turn out to be." - C.S. Lewis

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    Thanks, KK, for posting these passages. I had never read this piece before, and those quotes stand out for me like screaming neon billboards.
    "We're not necessarily doubting that God will do the best for us; we are wondering how painful the best will turn out to be." - C.S. Lewis

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    I always thought JR's comment about feeling better after she was "found" (even though she was DEAD) because then he knew where she was - astounding! I was stunned to read that he'd rather have had a dead child than a missing child that could still be alive!
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeeDee View Post
    I always thought JR's comment about feeling better after she was "found" (even though she was DEAD) because then he knew where she was - astounding! I was stunned to read that he'd rather have had a dead child than a missing child that could still be alive!
    I think John was trying to summon up feelings that he'd heard other parents of kidnapped children say but, in true Ramsey fashion, he managed to screw up the soundbite because he didn't really have to feel that emotion.

    Parents of children who disappear without a trace - and then remain missing for long periods of time - have been known to express that even finding out the horrible truth that their child is dead might be better than living year after year without knowing. It doesn't mean they want them dead, it's more about acknowledging they might be and wanting to know, one way or the other.

    But, there's a huge difference between that sentiment and John's glib comment about how dandy it was that the loose ends could be tied up so quickly - even if it meant a sexually molested, strangled and bludgeoned little daughter in his basement.

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    Yes, John Ramsey always seems to be "imitating" what he THINKS is the politically correct thing to say. He has no capacity for deception like Patsy did, though. He cannot pull it off.

    Patsy was as fake as her implants, but she was good at it. She seems to have spent her life creating an image of perfection. Yet when that image was shattered, with the ugly, raw truth no longer capable of being hidden from all who knew her to be sooooooo perfectly everything, what lies beneath came out. Then she staged the finest performance of her life, the one all the rest had been preparing her to deliver. She pulled it off, too. At least, she kept them out of prison.

    Alas...the evidence ripped the mask from her face for the public. At least, for those not blinded by their own pre-conceptions about who the Ramseys were, the evidence tells the tale.

    And the Ramseys were far from an ideal family.

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
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    Quote Originally Posted by koldkase View Post
    Yes, John Ramsey always seems to be "imitating" what he THINKS is the politically correct thing to say. He has no capacity for deception like Patsy did, though. He cannot pull it off.

    Patsy was as fake as her implants, but she was good at it. She seems to have spent her life creating an image of perfection. Yet when that image was shattered, with the ugly, raw truth no longer capable of being hidden from all who knew her to be sooooooo perfectly everything, what lies beneath came out. Then she staged the finest performance of her life, the one all the rest had been preparing her to deliver. She pulled it off, too. At least, she kept them out of prison.

    Alas...the evidence ripped the mask from her face for the public. At least, for those not blinded by their own pre-conceptions about who the Ramseys were, the evidence tells the tale.

    And the Ramseys were far from an ideal family.
    And despite all of that, I can't hate her.
    They should all drown in lakes of blood. Now they will know why they are afraid of the dark. Now they will learn why they fear the night.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Punisher View Post
    And despite all of that, I can't hate her.

    Nor should you, Punisher. I don't hate any of the Ramseys. But I do hate what they did. ALL they did that hurt so many, but especially JonBenet.

    They will go down in history along with OJ, Lizzie Borden, and the many infamous "Umbrella People". That's the justice their heirs will always carry on their shoulders.

    You see, no matter how bad the truth is, lying is always worse. The Ramseys' real Achilles Heel is their arrogance and willingness to let everyone ELSE take the blame for what they did. That shows who they REALLY are: Whatever happened in the family that resulted in JonBenet's molestation and murder that night, that resulted from human weakness and depravity that went unchecked and then spun out of control; What happened AFTER the initial crimes came from pure, deliberate, premeditated evil, IMO. Laying THEIR sins publicly at the doors of others defines their lack of remorse or conscience, to me.

    They are justifiably in OJ's league, IMO.

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
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    Except that OJ was probably influenced by his fame and fortune to become as narcissistic as he is, while John Ramsey was not famous at all. He may have been well off, but not outrageously wealthy, and Patsy spent money like it was going out of style. Not that fame excuses OJ, because he is also very violent and abusive, but an ego that's already out of control does not respond well to fame or later on, the loss of that fame...

    I think the Ramseys are in a league of their own. Patsy seems to be more of a borderline personality to me, searching for a way to become significant and real, while John seems like textbook narcissism. If Patsy was not a BP, then she had been abused and was open to someone like John, who obviously has no conscience toward others, since he can sacrifice people who were his closest friends to the cause of keeping his own sorry arse out of jail.
    "We're not necessarily doubting that God will do the best for us; we are wondering how painful the best will turn out to be." - C.S. Lewis

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