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  1. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elle_1 View Post
    Thank you boesp for posting this. It is good to go over these recordings. It's hard to remember everything! It's nice to have you here. I can see you are well known by kk and cynic, so you will be amongst friends.

    Thank you kk for creating this post.
    Thank you for the welcome Elle. I am still amazed no one was prosecuted for this case.

  2. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by koldkase View Post
    I'll bring the shovels.



    But this is the charm and horror known as the Deep South, Elle.

    You may be familiar with the artistic genre in the South called Southern Gothic. It's a long tradition of writers and artists combining the grotesque with the absurdity of life.

    We have a lot of that here--must be all that heat and humidity.

    I could refer you to the literary works of Tennessee Williams, Eudora Welty, Flannery O'Connor, William Faulkner, Harper Lee, and many more...but there is no better example than Patsy Ramsey. What a freak show she was with all that high dudgeon drama and self-righteous delusion: evangelical religious fervor, "stage four cancer!", sex abuse, murder, beauty pageantry, and a world-wide audience hanging on every twisted act, lie, and exaggeration.

    This was Patsy's platform and she embraced it like she was ready for her close-up coming down the stairs of Tara.

    Patsy escaped justice and got her VICTORY!--as her sister Pam so brazenly told the world at her death. The metaphorical image of digging her up so she could finally answer for her crimes is pure Southern Gothic imagination.

    So am I a little macabre? Guilty! Along with Patsy.
    I hear you KK! You know I'm just teasing you, of course! I didn't know Patsy was from the South. I thought she had a harsh voice when speaking to the Boulder detectives. She showed her true self. Of course I understand your anger. We are all in this same boat here!
    elle: The RST can't handle the truth!
    Just my opinion.

  3. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by BOESP View Post
    Thank you for the welcome Elle. I am still amazed no one was prosecuted for this case.
    I think we all are boesp. If ever we needed a case to prove "money can fix anything" this was it, and it is good we have you and your friends here with sharp minds still determined to get the truth out. This board is a lot quieter than it once was many years ago, so let's hope you'll stay!
    elle: The RST can't handle the truth!
    Just my opinion.

  4. #112

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    Quote Originally Posted by koldkase View Post
    Time is now taking its toll on this case, so the more people who bother to keep it alive, the better the chance there is that the truth will be remembered and not Ramsey spin and disinformation.
    Sadly, that's all the justice Jonbenet is ever going to get.

    And that, my friend, is the absolute undeniable truth.

  5. #113

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    Quote Originally Posted by koldkase View Post
    You may be familiar with the artistic genre in the South called Southern Gothic. It's a long tradition of writers and artists combining the grotesque with the absurdity of life.

    We have a lot of that here--must be all that heat and humidity.

    I could refer you to the literary works of Tennessee Williams, Eudora Welty, Flannery O'Connor, William Faulkner, Harper Lee, and many more...but there is no better example than Patsy Ramsey. What a freak show she was with all that high dudgeon drama and self-righteous delusion: evangelical religious fervor, "stage four cancer!", sex abuse, murder, beauty pageantry, and a world-wide audience hanging on every twisted act, lie, and exaggeration.

    This was Patsy's platform and she embraced it like she was ready for her close-up coming down the stairs of Tara.
    Splendid! Loved every word and agree wholeheartedly!

    Patsy is a true Southern Gothic heroine ... equal parts grit, flirty debutante, drama queen and sufferer. Just add bourbon and Jesus.

    I once wrote a paper on Flannery O'Connor and the grotesque characters in her writings, who not only reflected the pain and disappointment in O'Connor's own life, but who went beyond normal anguish into the macabre and the nightmarish. The first time I read an O'Connor short story, I never wanted to read another because it was so wounding. It hurt to see my world pierced by O'Conner's hideous reality: people who seem to be good can be inhumanly evil, a gesture of kindness can really be a knife in your back, what appears to be hospitality is really perversion cloaked in manipulative charm.

    It was shattering to read O'Connor and realize the implications of not only her characters, but the world from which they came. They were twisted and misshapen, not only in their human forms, but in their souls. It is the same with Faulkner and Tennessee Williams and all the other great Southern writers. Tragedy and deliverance drape their words like Spanish moss, and those words speak of ruin and pride and unholy combinations of dark and light. Patsy was the ultimate in a realized Gothic character come to life. She played her part to the hilt, and she took no prisoners. It was the role of a lifetime, and Patsy knew it.

    "Grace, Love and Faithfulness Though All." And secrets.

    Don't forget the secrets. That's an important part of Southern gothic. Oh, and no one escapes unscathed.

  6. #114
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    I love this place....
    This is my Constitutionally protected OPINION. Please do not copy or take it anywhere else.

  7. #115

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cherokee View Post
    Splendid! Loved every word and agree wholeheartedly!

    Patsy is a true Southern Gothic heroine ... equal parts grit, flirty debutante, drama queen and sufferer. Just add bourbon and Jesus.

    I once wrote a paper on Flannery O'Connor and the grotesque characters in her writings, who not only reflected the pain and disappointment in O'Connor's own life, but who went beyond normal anguish into the macabre and the nightmarish. The first time I read an O'Connor short story, I never wanted to read another because it was so wounding. It hurt to see my world pierced by O'Conner's hideous reality: people who seem to be good can be inhumanly evil, a gesture of kindness can really be a knife in your back, what appears to be hospitality is really perversion cloaked in manipulative charm.

    It was shattering to read O'Connor and realize the implications of not only her characters, but the world from which they came. They were twisted and misshapen, not only in their human forms, but in their souls. It is the same with Faulkner and Tennessee Williams and all the other great Southern writers. Tragedy and deliverance drape their words like Spanish moss, and those words speak of ruin and pride and unholy combinations of dark and light. Patsy was the ultimate in a realized Gothic character come to life. She played her part to the hilt, and she took no prisoners. It was the role of a lifetime, and Patsy knew it.

    "Grace, Love and Faithfulness Though All." And secrets.

    Don't forget the secrets. That's an important part of Southern gothic. Oh, and no one escapes unscathed.
    Now I want to read your paper! I'm sure you got an A+.

    Ah, yes, the secrets. For some reason, Patsy reminds me of the short story "A Rose For Miss Emily." Miss Patsy sure had her secrets, and she made herself infamous for all time with them.

    I often wonder when her story will finally be told in full. Not the whitewashed Team Ramsey version; not even our "just the facts" version. I'd like to see someone who actually knew her, long term, from the inner circle, tell the unvarnished truth about her twisted life and mind and how that manifested in this murder and the aftermath.

    Probably won't happen in my lifetime, though, if ever, as those people aren't going to cross Team Ramsey. Not unless they want to make some serious money and send a big, metaphorical "fruit basket" to all the liars who have protected Patsy all these years.

    PS I do want to add that I grew up, lived with, and probably resemble some of those Southern Gothic characters, Chero. A friend from Chicago once told me she loved O'Connor and Welty because they made her laugh. I was stunned: they made me cry! I knew these people and there was nothing funny about their lives.
    Last edited by koldkase; November 14, 2012, 11:49 am at Wed Nov 14 11:49:32 UTC 2012.

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

    ~~~~~~~
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    3 Dimensional

    ~~~~~~
    My opinions, nothing more.

  8. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cherokee View Post
    Splendid! Loved every word and agree wholeheartedly!

    Patsy is a true Southern Gothic heroine ... equal parts grit, flirty debutante, drama queen and sufferer. Just add bourbon and Jesus.

    I once wrote a paper on Flannery O'Connor and the grotesque characters in her writings, who not only reflected the pain and disappointment in O'Connor's own life, but who went beyond normal anguish into the macabre and the nightmarish. The first time I read an O'Connor short story, I never wanted to read another because it was so wounding. It hurt to see my world pierced by O'Conner's hideous reality: people who seem to be good can be inhumanly evil, a gesture of kindness can really be a knife in your back, what appears to be hospitality is really perversion cloaked in manipulative charm.

    It was shattering to read O'Connor and realize the implications of not only her characters, but the world from which they came. They were twisted and misshapen, not only in their human forms, but in their souls. It is the same with Faulkner and Tennessee Williams and all the other great Southern writers. Tragedy and deliverance drape their words like Spanish moss, and those words speak of ruin and pride and unholy combinations of dark and light. Patsy was the ultimate in a realized Gothic character come to life. She played her part to the hilt, and she took no prisoners. It was the role of a lifetime, and Patsy knew it.

    "Grace, Love and Faithfulness Though All." And secrets.

    Don't forget the secrets. That's an important part of Southern gothic. Oh, and no one escapes unscathed.
    I was reading through a few old threads and came across this post of Cherokee's. I thought it was so well-written and insightful that I had to bump the thread. What a lot of talent this forum holds.
    "We're not necessarily doubting that God will do the best for us; we are wondering how painful the best will turn out to be." - C.S. Lewis

    MY OPINIONS - DO NOT COPY THEM ANYWHERE ELSE ON THE INTERNET!

  9. #117

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    Quote Originally Posted by heymom View Post
    I was reading through a few old threads and came across this post of Cherokee's. I thought it was so well-written and insightful that I had to bump the thread. What a lot of talent this forum holds.
    Thank you, Heymom, for the bump.

  10. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cherokee View Post
    Thank you, Heymom, for the bump.
    I was not born in the South, but have now lived *near* the South for 23 years, and have seen more of what Flannery O'Connor knew so intimately and wrote about, so your post reminded me of the difference in my reactions between when I first read her work (how bizarre! What a horror show!) and later on, after I'd been here for a while and seen some of that nastiness disguised with a charming smile (Of course! How true! I know that person!).
    "We're not necessarily doubting that God will do the best for us; we are wondering how painful the best will turn out to be." - C.S. Lewis

    MY OPINIONS - DO NOT COPY THEM ANYWHERE ELSE ON THE INTERNET!



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