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  1. #13

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    I made these up a few months ago, as this photo showed me more clearly how the cord laid against the cylindrical structure of the neck and rolled up. Then I didn't post the pics because it's so crudely done. But the point is that this might help understand the bruising pattern, so I'm going to put them up now.

    The two photos which aren't JonBenet's I'm putting in for comparison. They're from online autopsy pictures of strangulation victims, as well. Notice how each side of the victim's neck has similar areas of deep bruising. JonBenet's neck was much smaller and more fragile than an adult, so perhaps that added to the extensive bruising of the skin on her.

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    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

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    3 Dimensional

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    My opinions, nothing more.

  2. #14

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    Comparison photos of child's neck with head turned partially, causing the sterno-mastoid muscles to protrude. She was strangled from behind while on her stomach, with her head turned and pressed into the carpet by the paint tray, the evidence indicates to me. Also, a comparison Gray's Anatomy illustration of the neck--notice the "jugular notch" and the shadows there, much like the triangular bruise:

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    Last edited by koldkase; March 8, 2011, 3:30 am at Tue Mar 8 3:30:42 UTC 2011.

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

    ~~~~~~~
    Bloomies underwear model:
    3 Dimensional

    ~~~~~~
    My opinions, nothing more.

  3. #15

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    Here are some forensic pathology sources which explain the ligature and neck injuries: the first link is very readable with no graphic photos; the second is more technical and has graphic photos of various injuries and autopsy dissections which you may see while scrolling to the sections related to this case.

    http://www.corpus-delicti.com/ligature.html

    Be forewarned: the following link has extremely graphic autopsy photos of dissections, as well as damage to bodies done in ways you may not want to even think about, much less see.

    WARNING: GRAPHIC AUTOPSY PHOTOS AT THIS LINK

    Look for p. 267, "Asphyxia", as this is a partial chapter--it's for book sales:

    http://books.google.com/books?id=6bW...page&q&f=false

    Also at the second link, head injuries are described in great detail beginning on p. 323 under "Head Injury." Included are types of brain injury and skull fractures.

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

    ~~~~~~~
    Bloomies underwear model:
    3 Dimensional

    ~~~~~~
    My opinions, nothing more.

  4. #16

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    Working on some of the photos of the ligatures taken at autopsy, here is an enlargement of the frayed ends of the cord that was found still tied to the wrist. The cord ends appear unevenly cut, "sawed" vs "scissor-cut":

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    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

    ~~~~~~~
    Bloomies underwear model:
    3 Dimensional

    ~~~~~~
    My opinions, nothing more.

  5. #17

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    An enlargement of a frayed end of the ligature cord, this one from the ligature around the neck:

    Attached Images Attached Images  

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

    ~~~~~~~
    Bloomies underwear model:
    3 Dimensional

    ~~~~~~
    My opinions, nothing more.

  6. #18

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    Working with the autopsy photo of the ligature from the neck, I've enlarged one end which is frayed. Also I've enlarged the cut made by Dr. Meyer to remove it from the neck, where he made black marks to indicate which side was right/left.

    Notice the cut the medical examiner made: he had to work his way underneath the cord so tightly embedded into the neck, so he had a less than pristine straight cut, it appears. But even so, compare his cut with the other ends of the cords, which are very stressed.

    Finally, also enlarged is a spot on the cord which appears to be blood on the inside, but I'm not sure as the cord could be twisted--the clarity of the screen capture isn't great. Whose blood is that? How and when did it get on the cord? I don't remember it even being mentioned in any interviews, "touch" DNA proclamations...? Did I miss that?
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    Last edited by koldkase; April 30, 2012, 11:04 pm at Mon Apr 30 23:04:19 UTC 2012.

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

    ~~~~~~~
    Bloomies underwear model:
    3 Dimensional

    ~~~~~~
    My opinions, nothing more.

  7. #19

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    I want to keep these photos and enlargements of the ligature ends in a grouping on one page to compare easily, so I'm repeating them from page 2.

    Quote Originally Posted by koldkase View Post
    Working on some of the photos of the ligatures taken at autopsy, here is an enlargement of the frayed ends of the cord that was found still tied to the wrist. The cord ends appear unevenly cut, "sawed" vs "scissor-cut":


    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

    ~~~~~~~
    Bloomies underwear model:
    3 Dimensional

    ~~~~~~
    My opinions, nothing more.

  8. #20

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    Now look at the end of the cord which was closely wrapped on the paintbrush segment used as a handle for the ligature: it's perfectly cut, cleanly, with no unraveling and nothing uneven.
    Attached Images Attached Images    

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

    ~~~~~~~
    Bloomies underwear model:
    3 Dimensional

    ~~~~~~
    My opinions, nothing more.

  9. #21

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    About that paintbrush which was broken at the paint tray in the basement, just outside the cellar room where the body was later found:

    I've done some mixing and matching, re-sizing and cropping of the photos we have of the ligature paintbrush "handle," around which the cord was tied, and the bristle end of the paintbrush which was found still in the paint tray. This is a crude demonstration--sorry for that, but I wanted to see how that brush end fit on the handle as I've had problems imagining how someone broke it so readily that night. The autopsy report stated it was jagged.

    Here's an example of a general type of paintbrush with the various parts labeled, though I don't know exactly what kind was used in the murder because I can't see the brush end very well:

    http://painting.about.com/od/artsupp...rush-Parts.htm



    Looking at the following pictures, I may have found a clue: the paintbrush was broken at the ferrule--the silver part where the wood is attached to the bristles. That would be the weakest part and it does appear that this is exactly where the handle was broken from the brush end. See what you think comparing photos at the bottom of this post.

    These of the "handle" are not exactly to scale, but the original autopsy photos had a cm rule which I measured to try to enlarge the crops so that they're fairly accurate--a little larger actually, but close enough for my purpose. Using the medical examiner's ruler in the pictures, the broken handle was approx. 13 cm, as best as I could approximate the measure with my ruler.

    *The top photo is of the paintbrush "handle" with the wrapped cord turned so that the "neatly cut" end of the cord is hidden (see posts above/earlier on this thread to reference the cord end). Notice the jagged end to the right of this section of the handle--that's where it appears the broken end of the brush was snapped. Now look at the center photo of the brush end and imagine turning it over to fit into the shape of the rough break, like a three dimensional puzzle.

    *The middle photo is of that broken brush end, with the silver ferrule between the bristles and the wood. If I could roll it over, it appears that it would fit onto the jagged end of the "garrote" or ligature handle in the photo above it. Remember the larger diameter on the right end of the handle would have been attached to the ferrule, with the narrowing end on the left tapering off in diameter to a point--the missing end of the handle.

    *The last photo is of the brush handle flipped on the other side, the one showing the end of the cord cut neatly (see above). If you notice the slight diagonal of the right end, it appears to me to fit the small protrusion of jagged wood right above the ferrule.

    I'm using a bit of imagination, of course, as I don't have a 3-dimensional computer program to animate this for us. But I'm sure LE was able to do this with the real items of evidence, anyway, so it's not important here except to answer some questions I've long had: it would have been much easier to break the paintbrush where the ferrule meets the wood handle. So now I can see how it was done, even if someone had to use a heel to snap it.

    Now look at the end on the left--that's rather neatly done, isn't it? That end would have less diameter, as paintbrushes often taper on that end, so it would have been easier to break, as well, though I have to say I'm not sure a 10 year old boy could have done it. Not unless whittling was involved, and it doesn't appear to be quite so splintered as the other end at the ferrule, but so far I can't tell.
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    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

    ~~~~~~~
    Bloomies underwear model:
    3 Dimensional

    ~~~~~~
    My opinions, nothing more.

  10. #22

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    Edit: The photo I use here of the paintbrush handle/wood apparently was flipped at some point--like a mirror image sort of, same details but backwards. I might have done this inadvertently at some point, or maybe it was aired that way on the program from which it was captured. Comparing photos today I realized this, so I went back and made corrections to my composite. Sorry for any confusion this has caused; I think it's right now.

    One more group of comparisons to clarify, hopefully: these are from the photo of the ligature handle on the rug in the home before the body was removed. I rotated the handle picture from the original screen capture I was working with to maintain the same direction as the above grouping. I notice the handle wood is actually rolled over a little bit from the other photos I've used, as well--see how the cord is jutting out at the knot? Imagine rolling the barrel of the broken ferrule/brush over about 180 degrees (estimate) to match it up with the broken section on the right of the wood "handle." (If that makes any sense...I'm truly out of my league here, clearly.)

    I've also used the same paint tray photo crop of the brush end of the broken paintbrush for comparison as well:
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    Last edited by koldkase; May 1, 2012, 2:22 pm at Tue May 1 14:22:44 UTC 2012.

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

    ~~~~~~~
    Bloomies underwear model:
    3 Dimensional

    ~~~~~~
    My opinions, nothing more.

  11. #23

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    Unless the Charity for Computer Program Dunces shows up soon, this is the best I can do. I wanted to lay the broken ferrule/brush end section over the handle broken end, but no luck. I did flip the ferrule end and line it up for a very general visual comparison. (Yes, I'm a detail freak.) Hope this helps.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

    ~~~~~~~
    Bloomies underwear model:
    3 Dimensional

    ~~~~~~
    My opinions, nothing more.

  12. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by koldkase View Post
    Unless the Charity for Computer Program Dunces shows up soon, this is the best I can do. I wanted to lay the broken ferrule/brush end section over the handle broken end, but no luck. I did flip the ferrule end and line it up for a very general visual comparison. (Yes, I'm a detail freak.) Hope this helps.
    I've done the overlay but with the low res pics it's difficult to pick out what pixels belong to what. If it's not what you had in mind, feel free to delete it.



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