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  1. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by RiverRat View Post
    "John Hunter-Hauck was born to Alex Hunter and his wife, Margie Hauck, on June 20, 1989."

    http://www.coloradodaily.com/ci_1504...#axzz10qeJIYEz
    You know, you've jarred my memory of something I heard/read Hunter say some years ago, explaining why he'd left office at the end of his term after the JB murder. He said he had a child approx. JB's age and he wanted to have more time to be with him, as the work load had been extreme during the murder investigation, etc. I think that's about what he said. I remember it because at the time, hearing his son was near JB's age made an impression on me, for obvious reasons.

    I wonder if this was the son Hunter meant, because JB would be 20 now.

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

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  2. #26

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    I didn't post any updates on this story here because ...it seemed...enough.

    But we're discussing on another thread Hunter's own history of a lack of sensitivity or ethical responsibility as a prosecutor, towards murder victims and their families while aiding suspects in avoiding murder charges, was zero to none, when it came to vigorously seeking justice for them, at any rate. So I want to document the outcome of his own son's death for that discussion, as Hunter's pattern of closing his eyes to the truth he doesn't want to face, while thumbing his nose at the law he once represented, seems evident here, as well.

    Apparently, Hunter wants us to believe he never read the police report on his son's drug overdose. The drug in question was oxycontin, which it has been said was taken from Hunter's own medicine cabinet by his son.

    Some of these articles are no longer fully available without paying for them, but I've scavenged what's important.

    Here the toxicology report was published for John Hunter-Hauck:

    Coroner: Oxycontin, alcohol mix killed student


    Submitted by lebowski on Wed, 05/19/2010 - 07:00 Alcoholic beverage Alcoholism Alex Hunter Analgesic Boulder County District Attorney Coroner Greg Fairman Depressant District Attorney Drug addiction Drug culture Drug overdose Fort Collins Police Greg Fairman Hauck John Hunter Hauck Jon Benet Ramsey Medicine Minnesota Oxycontin Psychoactive drugs Rita Davis spokeswoman Substance-related disorders United States university spokeswoman

    Link :
    Fort Collins Coloradoan

    BY NATE TAYLOR 5/19/2010 A CSU student who died earlier this month from an overdose after consuming alcohol, marijuana and prescription medication had a blood alcohol level of .212. John Hunter Hauck's blood alcohol level was almost three times the legal limit to drive. Larimer County Deputy Coroner Greg Fairman said Hauck's blood alcohol content typically is not enough to be fatal, but he said because Hauck likely mixed the alcohol with an opiate, the mixture turned deadly.

    Read More
    http://www.medicinalcolorado.org/node/3118

    Gossip has it that the police report states John Hunter-Hauck went to his father's house for dinner the night before his death with a friend. The friend allegedly told the police that John took an unknown number of the oxycontin pills from his father's medicine cabinet and began consuming them on the way back to Ft. Collins. The next morning, John was found dead at the home of his friend in Ft. Collins.

    But this is not the end of the story. Continued in the next post....
    Last edited by Moab; June 12, 2011, 10:40 am at Sun Jun 12 10:40:53 UTC 2011. Reason: Editing at KK's request

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

    ~~~~~~~
    Bloomies underwear model:
    3 Dimensional

    ~~~~~~
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  3. #27

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    One would think that Hunter might actually want to know the truth about how his son died from an overdose of a prescription drug not prescribed for John himself. If the gossip about the police report is true, the answer is right there. Gosh, a DA for 28 years and he doesn't even bother to read the police report of his son's death from drug overdose?

    Hunter has/had prostate cancer, allegedly, so that could have been why he had the pain killer--I have no personal knowledge of any of this, though.

    Here we have Hunter, a year later, talking about how he'll never know...if his son got those pills from Hunter's own cabinet:

    [There is a video interview at this link, as well as the following article. These videos do get taken down after a period of time, so watch it now if you want to see it. Articles also eventually disappear, so for that reason, I'm posting this.]

    http://www.9news.com/rss/story.aspx?storyid=195998

    Former Boulder DA Alex Hunter continues to mourn loss of son
    10:01 PM, Apr 29, 2011 |


    Written by
    Jeffrey Wolf

    Written by
    Chris Vanderveen


    BOULDER - Alex Hunter will likely never know if the pain pills he once left in his medicine cabinet were the same pain pills that led to the death of his son. To be honest, he says, he wasn't keeping track of just how many pills he had left.

    But the lingering doubt is clearly tearing the former Boulder County District Attorney apart.

    "I was careless, and from an old prosecutor's standpoint, I was reckless in having [OxyContin] in the medicine cabinet," he said.

    "I made the grave mistake of keeping these old pills which I thought I might use one day," he said as he shook his head slightly.

    Hunter is widely known as the one-time chief prosecutor during the early stages of the JonBenet Ramsey murder investigation. He left the office in 2001.

    John Hunter-Hauck, 20, was a Colorado State University sophomore when he passed away inside his off-campus home in Fort Collins on May 3, 2010. A coroner's investigation found he died from a lethal combination of alcohol and prescription pain medication.

    A day before he died, he was with his father inside Alex Hunter's Boulder home.

    "I had [OxyContin] in my medicine cabinet. I wasn't using it at the time. I was sloppy about it, so now I've got my story as well as John's," he said. "People need to understand just how potent this stuff is."

    Nearly a year after his son's death, Hunter says he remains determined to convince others to keep their prescription medications out of reach if not thoroughly locked away.

    "We need to lock this stuff up. This is like keeping a gun cabinet unlocked," he said.

    Hunter-Hauck was an avid outdoorsman, as comfortable on a snowboard as he was on a surfboard.

    "John loved everybody and everything," his dad said. "John would sit on a rock [in our backyard] with his buddies and look at the stars, look at the foothills and have young man's dreams. And then it was gone. He could have been anything he wanted to be."

    "This subject has been in the shadows for a long time. We just don't address it," Beverly Gmerek, the prescription drug abuse prevention program coordinator at Peer Assisted Services, said "We think a lot about drunk driving, and we've changed a lot of our behavior around that, but we haven't changed the way we think about prescription drug medication."

    In 2009, for example, Gmerek says 445 people in Colorado died from prescription drug abuse, more than twice the number of people who died that year in drunk-driving related crashes.

    "The youth who have been surveyed say [pain pills] are easier to get than beer. It's right in everyone's homes," she said.

    The Colorado Prescription Drug Monitoring Program's numbers indicate that between 2007 and early 2010, an average of 41,203 hydrocodone prescriptions and 34,516 oxycodone prescriptions were filled for Denver residents every three months.

    Gmerek says the country needs to get rid of its "just in case I need it" attitude toward pain medications specifically.

    Hunter is now working with Gmerek to increase awareness of the issue. A 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health suggested their focus may be justified. That survey found that more than 70 percent of people who abused prescription pain relievers got them from friends and relatives, "while approximately 5 percent got them from a drug dealer or from the internet."

    On Saturday, the DEA will conduct its second annual "National Drug Take-Back Initiative" that will place prescription drug drop off locations all over the country. To find a location near you go to http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/dr...ack/index.html.

    Hunter says he still is having a tough time coping with all of this. It was only last May when a trio of people showed up at his front door ready to tell him the news.

    "I think every parent worries about that call that may come in the night. We had a knock on the door," he said.

    He knew the news wasn't going to be good when he saw that two of the three were victim's advocates.

    The old prosecutor was told by a Boulder Police officer what he most feared.

    "In every professional way possible, he said, 'Your son is dead,'" Hunter said.

    "As much as I'd like to duck my possible piece of that," he said. "I can't."

    (KUSA-TV 2011 Multimedia Holdings Corporation)
    Last edited by Moab; June 12, 2011, 10:36 am at Sun Jun 12 10:36:55 UTC 2011. Reason: Editing at KK's request

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

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    3 Dimensional

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  4. #28

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    So sad! My sympathy to the family.

  5. #29
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    I would say it seemed like someone put the pillow over his face because he was snoring loudly, as they said. No one wanted to admit they were the ones who put the pillow there but a snoring person is ASLEEP. They won't put a pillow over their own face because they do not know they are snoring.
    A person's respiration may be slowed by narcotics like that, and the pillow may have smothered him in that state, whereas it wouldn't have had he not been under the influence. The drug/alcohol combo may have been enough to kill him anyway, and the pillow may not have been a factor in the death. But either way, I'd bet someone covered him to muffle the snoring and was too afraid to come forward.
    This is my Constitutionally protected OPINION. Please do not copy or take it anywhere else.

  6. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by DeeDee View Post
    I would say it seemed like someone put the pillow over his face because he was snoring loudly, as they said. No one wanted to admit they were the ones who put the pillow there but a snoring person is ASLEEP. They won't put a pillow over their own face because they do not know they are snoring.
    A person's respiration may be slowed by narcotics like that, and the pillow may have smothered him in that state, whereas it wouldn't have had he not been under the influence. The drug/alcohol combo may have been enough to kill him anyway, and the pillow may not have been a factor in the death. But either way, I'd bet someone covered him to muffle the snoring and was too afraid to come forward.
    Hunter told LE he didn't want any investigation, according to news articles. Since his son was using a controlled substance, oxycontin, without a prescription, my guess is that Hunter doesn't want any further scrutiny on the events that took place leading up to his son's death.

    Oxycontin is the equivalent of medical heroin, by the way. Serious stuff.

    Another article with info:
    Coroner: Oxycontin, alcohol mix killed CSU student
    4:26 PM, May 19, 2010

    Written by
    Dan Boniface

    FORT COLLINS - A CSU student who died earlier this month from an overdose after consuming alcohol, marijuana and prescription medication had a blood alcohol level of .212.

    John Hunter Hauck's blood alcohol level was almost three times the legal limit to drive.

    Larimer County Deputy Coroner Greg Fairman said Hauck's blood alcohol content typically is not enough to be fatal, but he said because Hauck likely mixed the alcohol with an opiate, the mixture turned deadly.

    Fairman said it is believed Hauck had taken prescription pain medication from his parents' home that contained Oxycontin, an opiate that is also a depressant.

    "Alcohol is a depressant and Oxycontin is a depressant," Fairman said. "You put a lot of depressants on board, and it's going to shut the system down."

    Toxicology tests are still pending that could confirm the suspicion that Oxycontin was the drug in Hauck's system, Fairman said. It will take at least a week before the results are available from a lab in Minnesota.

    Hauck, 20, was found at a friend's home about 2:30 p.m. May 5 after a night of partying.

    "They partied until late morning, passed out until afternoon," Fairman said.

    Fort Collins police spokeswoman Rita Davis said police might seek charges in the case, but that decision will wait until the coroner issues a formal cause of death ruling.

    Hauck's father is former Boulder County District Attorney Alex Hunter, who gained international attention because he was in office during the initial investigation into the death of Jon Benet Ramsey.

    Hauck enrolled at CSU in fall 2008 and had not declared a major, a university spokeswoman said.

    Written by Nate Taylor, Fort Collins Coloradoan.
    http://www.9news.com/rss/story.aspx?storyid=139244
    Last edited by koldkase; June 12, 2011, 1:46 pm at Sun Jun 12 13:46:13 UTC 2011.

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

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    3 Dimensional

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  7. #31

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    I found one article I had saved on this, which I'm posting here as it's no longer online that I can find. It confirms some of the info posted already.

    May 17, 2010 6:16 pm US/Mountain

    Coroner: Alcohol, Drugs Led To CSU Student's Death

    Reporting
    Mike Hooker

    FORT COLLINS, Colo. (CBS4) ―
    Click to enlarge
    1 of 1
    John Hunter Hauck
    CBS
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    Related Stories
    Police Investigate CSU Student's Death
    (5/6/2010)
    Mixing Alcohol & Drugs Deadly Reminder At CSU
    (5/7/2010)
    The Larimer County coroner has released new information about the combination of alcohol and drugs that apparently led to the death of a student at Colorado State University.

    John Hunter-Hauck was a 20-year-old student at CSU. He was the son of the former district attorney in Boulder, Alex Hunter. It was at an off-campus house where Hunter-Hauck never woke up after a night of partying two weeks ago.

    Coroner's investigator Greg Fairman said preliminary blood tests show that Hunter-Hauck's blood alcohol level was .212, the limit for drunk driving is .08. He also tested positive for opiates, including oxycodone, which like alcohol depresses the body and together the two can kill by making a person simply stop breathing.

    Fairman also said witnesses say Hunter-Hauck obtained the prescription drug oxycodone from his parents' house in Boulder earlier in the day on May 2 before returning to Fort Collins to party with friends. Witnesses also told investigators that Hunter-Hauck had snorted the powder from a crushed oxycodone pill.

    Oxycodone is a time-release drug, but when crushed the time release doesn't work -- the user gets it all at once, which makes it that much more dangerous.

    Fairman said Hunter-Hauck's death is a tragic example of the danger of mixing alcohol with prescription drugs.

    The coroner's office still hasn't ruled on the actual cause of death -- that could take a couple more weeks because investigators still have to get the final, more detailed, results back from the blood tests.

    Fort Collins police said they are still investigating whether there should be any criminal charges filed.

    http://cbs4denver.com/news/csu.stude...2.1699526.html

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

    ~~~~~~~
    Bloomies underwear model:
    3 Dimensional

    ~~~~~~
    My opinions, nothing more.

  8. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by koldkase View Post
    Hunter told LE he didn't want any investigation, according to news articles. Since his son was using a controlled substance, oxycontin, without a prescription, my guess is that Hunter doesn't want any further scrutiny on the events that took place leading up to his son's death.
    But Mother, They Were In Your Medicine Cabinet
    By Steve Hayes, Director

    TEEN PRESCRIPTION DRUG ABUSE

    According to the Partnership for a Drug-Free America:

    • 1 in 5 teens has abused a prescription pain medication

    • 1 in 5 teens report abusing prescription stimulants and tranquilizers

    • 1 in 10 teens have abused cough medication

    According to the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy:

    • Though overall teen drug use is down nationwide, more teens abuse prescription drugs than any other illicit drug except marijuana - more than cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine combined.

    • Every day, 2,500 kids aged 12-17 abuse a prescription painkiller for the first time and more people are getting addicted to prescription drugs.

    • Drug treatment admissions for prescription painkillers increased more than 300 percent from 1995 to 2005.

    • Teens are abusing prescription drugs because many believe the myth that these drugs provide a "safe" high.

    • Especially troubling is that the majority of teens who abuse prescription drugs say they are easy to get and are often free.

    PHARM PARTIES

    At Novus some of our patients are young people who tell us about parties that kids as young as 11 attend. Instead of bringing a present, each child is to bring some prescription drugs that they got from their parents' medicine cabinet. When they arrive at the party, they go into a room and pour the drugs into a punch bowl. Then the kids will take turns reaching into the bowl and taking a handful of pills. Sometimes the kids combine this with alcohol--an often lethal combination. When confronted by astounded parents, their children often remark that it is ok because these are not illegal drugs-- they were purchased at a pharmacy and, after all, they were in their parents' medicine cabinet. A 15-year-old was quoted as saying that she saw the drug advertised on television and if it were dangerous it wouldn't be on television.

    SOME DON'T GET A SECOND CHANCE

    It is not pleasant, but if you spend a few minutes on the internet you will see not statistics but real stories of prescription drug overdoses and deaths of teens. In many of these instances, the fatal drug overdose did not come after long periods of prescription drug use. The fatal overdoses came the first time they took the prescription drugs. Maybe it was their individual DNA. Maybe it was the way that the drug was metabolized. Maybe it was another substance that they had taken, like alcohol or another prescription drug. The only thing for sure is that some young people have overdosed and died after their first use.

    One 18 year old died after taking 40 milligrams of Oxycontin while drinking a beer. A 16 year old died after taking 80 milligrams of OxyContin that she was given by a "friend." Some of the other deceased children's parents said that they didn't believe in taking any type of drugs, but that didn't stop their children from yielding to peer pressure and "trying" the drug.

    MOST ABUSED DRUGS

    Painkillers (OxyContin and its generic form oxycodone, Lortab, Vicodin, Percodan, Percocet and the Fentanyl Patch) are the most common pharmaceuticals abused by teens, especially by younger teens. Stimulants (Ritalin, Adderall) abuse is more common among older teens and college students than younger teens. Benzodiazepines (Xanax, Valium, Klonopin) are abused by teens of all ages.

    Oxies, OC, hillbilly heroin, oxycotton, 80s, percs, vikes, and vikings are commonly used terms to refer to painkillers.
    ...

    The danger to teens from all of these prescription drugs is greatly increased when they are combined with each other or with alcohol.

    No caring parent would leave heroin, cocaine or other dangerous street drugs on their nightstand or in the medicine cabinet or just dump it in the garbage. However, many parents do exactly this with legal heroin, legal cocaine: antidepressants and benzodiazepines.

    BANKRUPTCY AND POSSIBLE PRISON FOR NEGLIGENT PARENTS

    In our society where it seems that every bad thing must be blamed on someone else and that someone else should pay, there is real financial and legal liability if these dangerous drugs are taken by teens.

    Most of us are aware that if a child obtains a loaded gun from our house and someone is harmed, we can have both civil and criminal liability for not having properly locked up the weapon. We have read of people being sued and losing their homes and most of their assets because of the use of the unsecured weapon. We have also seen people who have actually been prosecuted for their negligence of leaving a loaded gun around and were sent to prison.

    Prescription drugs are highly regulated. They can only be obtained if a doctor writes a prescription. They carry many serious warnings. Every day there are more stories about prescription drug abuse, the dangers of prescription drugs and the deaths caused by prescription drugs.

    If your son or daughter were to give another child these prescription drugs and they were to overdose and die, it is highly likely that a civil suit against you for negligence will result in your having to pay damages.

    There is also a chance that you could face criminal prosecution for your leaving dangerous drugs around that could lead to the death of another.


    CREATING CRIMINALS

    Maybe your child is an entrepreneur and does not take the prescription drugs that he or she gets from your medicine cabinet or bedside table but instead sells them to others. Possession of controlled substances with intent to sell is a crime. The painkillers are mostly Schedule II drugs. Ritalin and Adderall are Schedule II drugs. Most benzodiazepines are Schedule IV drugs.

    According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation's report "Crime in the United States", there were 143,639 juveniles arrested by state and local law enforcement agencies for drug abuse violations during 2006, representing 10.4% of the drug arrests in which the offender's age was reported.

    If your child is caught in possession of any amount of painkillers or stimulants here are the federal guidelines:

    •First Offense: Not more than 20 years. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, or more than life. Fine $1 million.
    •Second Offense: Not more than 30 years. If death or serious injury, not less than life. Fine $2 million.
    If your child is caught with benzodiazepines, here are the federal guidelines:

    •First Offense: Not more than 3 years. Fine not more than $250,000.
    •Second Offense: Not more than 6 years. Fine not more than $500,000.

    Obviously, if your child is treated as a minor the guidelines can be different, but it is still drug trafficking. By leaving prescription drugs around and by not educating our kids about the dangers of prescription drugs, they risk not only serious injury or death but also prison.

    http://www.novusdetox.com/newsletter_new/3-6-08.php

  9. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by cynic View Post
    But Mother, They Were In Your Medicine Cabinet
    By Steve Hayes, Director

    TEEN PRESCRIPTION DRUG ABUSE

    According to the Partnership for a Drug-Free America:

    • 1 in 5 teens has abused a prescription pain medication

    • 1 in 5 teens report abusing prescription stimulants and tranquilizers

    • 1 in 10 teens have abused cough medication

    According to the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy:

    • Though overall teen drug use is down nationwide, more teens abuse prescription drugs than any other illicit drug except marijuana - more than cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine combined.

    • Every day, 2,500 kids aged 12-17 abuse a prescription painkiller for the first time and more people are getting addicted to prescription drugs.

    • Drug treatment admissions for prescription painkillers increased more than 300 percent from 1995 to 2005.

    • Teens are abusing prescription drugs because many believe the myth that these drugs provide a "safe" high.

    • Especially troubling is that the majority of teens who abuse prescription drugs say they are easy to get and are often free.

    PHARM PARTIES

    At Novus some of our patients are young people who tell us about parties that kids as young as 11 attend. Instead of bringing a present, each child is to bring some prescription drugs that they got from their parents' medicine cabinet. When they arrive at the party, they go into a room and pour the drugs into a punch bowl. Then the kids will take turns reaching into the bowl and taking a handful of pills. Sometimes the kids combine this with alcohol--an often lethal combination. When confronted by astounded parents, their children often remark that it is ok because these are not illegal drugs-- they were purchased at a pharmacy and, after all, they were in their parents' medicine cabinet. A 15-year-old was quoted as saying that she saw the drug advertised on television and if it were dangerous it wouldn't be on television.

    SOME DON'T GET A SECOND CHANCE

    It is not pleasant, but if you spend a few minutes on the internet you will see not statistics but real stories of prescription drug overdoses and deaths of teens. In many of these instances, the fatal drug overdose did not come after long periods of prescription drug use. The fatal overdoses came the first time they took the prescription drugs. Maybe it was their individual DNA. Maybe it was the way that the drug was metabolized. Maybe it was another substance that they had taken, like alcohol or another prescription drug. The only thing for sure is that some young people have overdosed and died after their first use.

    One 18 year old died after taking 40 milligrams of Oxycontin while drinking a beer. A 16 year old died after taking 80 milligrams of OxyContin that she was given by a "friend." Some of the other deceased children's parents said that they didn't believe in taking any type of drugs, but that didn't stop their children from yielding to peer pressure and "trying" the drug.

    MOST ABUSED DRUGS

    Painkillers (OxyContin and its generic form oxycodone, Lortab, Vicodin, Percodan, Percocet and the Fentanyl Patch) are the most common pharmaceuticals abused by teens, especially by younger teens. Stimulants (Ritalin, Adderall) abuse is more common among older teens and college students than younger teens. Benzodiazepines (Xanax, Valium, Klonopin) are abused by teens of all ages.

    Oxies, OC, hillbilly heroin, oxycotton, 80s, percs, vikes, and vikings are commonly used terms to refer to painkillers.
    ...

    The danger to teens from all of these prescription drugs is greatly increased when they are combined with each other or with alcohol.

    No caring parent would leave heroin, cocaine or other dangerous street drugs on their nightstand or in the medicine cabinet or just dump it in the garbage. However, many parents do exactly this with legal heroin, legal cocaine: antidepressants and benzodiazepines.

    BANKRUPTCY AND POSSIBLE PRISON FOR NEGLIGENT PARENTS

    In our society where it seems that every bad thing must be blamed on someone else and that someone else should pay, there is real financial and legal liability if these dangerous drugs are taken by teens.

    Most of us are aware that if a child obtains a loaded gun from our house and someone is harmed, we can have both civil and criminal liability for not having properly locked up the weapon. We have read of people being sued and losing their homes and most of their assets because of the use of the unsecured weapon. We have also seen people who have actually been prosecuted for their negligence of leaving a loaded gun around and were sent to prison.

    Prescription drugs are highly regulated. They can only be obtained if a doctor writes a prescription. They carry many serious warnings. Every day there are more stories about prescription drug abuse, the dangers of prescription drugs and the deaths caused by prescription drugs.

    If your son or daughter were to give another child these prescription drugs and they were to overdose and die, it is highly likely that a civil suit against you for negligence will result in your having to pay damages.

    There is also a chance that you could face criminal prosecution for your leaving dangerous drugs around that could lead to the death of another.


    CREATING CRIMINALS

    Maybe your child is an entrepreneur and does not take the prescription drugs that he or she gets from your medicine cabinet or bedside table but instead sells them to others. Possession of controlled substances with intent to sell is a crime. The painkillers are mostly Schedule II drugs. Ritalin and Adderall are Schedule II drugs. Most benzodiazepines are Schedule IV drugs.

    According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation's report "Crime in the United States", there were 143,639 juveniles arrested by state and local law enforcement agencies for drug abuse violations during 2006, representing 10.4% of the drug arrests in which the offender's age was reported.

    If your child is caught in possession of any amount of painkillers or stimulants here are the federal guidelines:

    •First Offense: Not more than 20 years. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, or more than life. Fine $1 million.
    •Second Offense: Not more than 30 years. If death or serious injury, not less than life. Fine $2 million.
    If your child is caught with benzodiazepines, here are the federal guidelines:

    •First Offense: Not more than 3 years. Fine not more than $250,000.
    •Second Offense: Not more than 6 years. Fine not more than $500,000.

    Obviously, if your child is treated as a minor the guidelines can be different, but it is still drug trafficking. By leaving prescription drugs around and by not educating our kids about the dangers of prescription drugs, they risk not only serious injury or death but also prison.

    http://www.novusdetox.com/newsletter_new/3-6-08.php
    Brilliant. So this time, Hunter was covering his own azz.

    Problem is, according to witness testimony already given to the police, crimes were committed.

    So it's just another example of LE in Colorado deciding since those who committed crimes were such nice and/or wealthy people, no need to enforce the law.

    And again, Alex Hunter has proven that our justice system is corrupt and certainly has no intention of being blind to class, money, and power.

    Therefore it's broken. We have no justice system in this country which is practiced blindly, with equality, under the law, but a selective facist operation which chooses who will end up being charged with crimes based on who they are and who they know, not the laws they broke.

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

    ~~~~~~~
    Bloomies underwear model:
    3 Dimensional

    ~~~~~~
    My opinions, nothing more.

  10. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by koldkase View Post
    And again, Alex Hunter has proven that our justice system is corrupt and certainly has no intention of being blind to class, money, and power.

    Therefore it's broken. We have no justice system in this country which is practiced blindly, with equality, under the law, but a selective facist operation which chooses who will end up being charged with crimes based on who they are and who they know, not the laws they broke.
    This was showcased beautifully in the Skakel/Moxley case and repeated here in the JonBenet case. The only optimistic note is that there was justice for Martha Moxley after it appeared there would be none.

  11. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by cynic View Post
    This was showcased beautifully in the Skakel/Moxley case and repeated here in the JonBenet case. The only optimistic note is that there was justice for Martha Moxley after it appeared there would be none.
    And that was a dang miracle. But for his cousin's trial for rape, Skakel would still be bragging at parties about murdering Martha Moxley.

    God bless Dominick Dunne, wherever he is.

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

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