Page 4 of 21 FirstFirst 1234567814 ... LastLast
Results 37 to 48 of 242
  1. #37

    Default Back to Cherokee's Analysis, Please

    In the analysis thread, Cherokee has started the last part of the note.

    I've always thought that the note changed tone and the handwriting started to lose control right at the work "beheaded". If you think about it, that word is the most emotion-causing in the note, and in some ways the most true, with the poor child's neck so tightly squeezed by the cord that it looked like her head to come off. Also, remember the American Girl doll discussion of a few months back? Doll's heads come off, and JonBenet looked so much like her doll with the neck string when she was found.

    The note and the staging reveal such a disturbed mind, but a mind of a person that had some kind of drive to tell the truth.

  2. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,381

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wombat
    In the analysis thread, Cherokee has started the last part of the note.

    I've always thought that the note changed tone and the handwriting started to lose control right at the work "beheaded". If you think about it, that word is the most emotion-causing in the note, and in some ways the most true, with the poor child's neck so tightly squeezed by the cord that it looked like her head to come off. Also, remember the American Girl doll discussion of a few months back? Doll's heads come off, and JonBenet looked so much like her doll with the neck string when she was found.

    The note and the staging reveal such a disturbed mind, but a mind of a person that had some kind of drive to tell the truth.
    This is worth paying attention to, Wombat. Patsy's mind was disturbed and who knows what was going through her head as she was writing this ransom note. Planning and scheming. Writing whatever came into her head, at random; hoping to sidetrack the law.

    Good observation!
    elle: The RST can't handle the truth!
    Just my opinion.

  3. #39

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wombat
    In the analysis thread, Cherokee has started the last part of the note.

    I've always thought that the note changed tone and the handwriting started to lose control right at the work "beheaded". If you think about it, that word is the most emotion-causing in the note, and in some ways the most true, with the poor child's neck so tightly squeezed by the cord that it looked like her head to come off. Also, remember the American Girl doll discussion of a few months back? Doll's heads come off, and JonBenet looked so much like her doll with the neck string when she was found.

    The note and the staging reveal such a disturbed mind, but a mind of a person that had some kind of drive to tell the truth.
    You're absolutely right, Wombat.

    The ransom note actually has a kernel of truth for it's starting point. The reality of JonBenet's death, the cord around her neck (bringing an image of beheading) and her "remains" lying wrapped in the basement is the basis for the fantasy spun by the ransom note writer.

    In psychological terms, the writer is penning a confession of sorts ... or as you put it ... subconsciously they had "some kind of drive to tell the truth."

    The writing of this truth (and the accompanying images in the author's mind) pulls at the author's suppressed emotions and causes a change the tone and writing.

  4. #40
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,381

    Default

    Cherokee.

    I was looking for another new thread for the rest of your analysis. Geesh I hate being a dopey Senior at times. I missed your new posts. Have been busy here, so I'll go back and start reading your new posts. I wonder if anyone else was thinking the same (?) Maybe some of the younger ones
    thought this too.

    Thanks Wombat for posting Cherokee had started the last part. I feel awful!:(
    elle: The RST can't handle the truth!
    Just my opinion.

  5. #41
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,381

    Default

    The ransom note author is following the steps taught to all communications/journalism majors on how to write a story ... who, what, why, when, where, and how.

    It should be noted that Patsy Ramsey was a journalism major, and very proud of that accomplishment. She even used the initials of her bachelor’s degree in an anacronym with her name. Patsy knew how to write and tell a good story. Her “talent” portion for beauty pageants was dramatic speech.
    I agree with you all the way here, Cherokee. I have always equated Patsy being able to write her winning talent speech "overnight" from the play "The Pride of Miss Jean Brodie" with the ransom note. It was no problem for her to sit down and let her mind take over her pen.

    She couldn't get the copyright from the play so she was forced into writing another speech, and with the help of a friend, she managed it overnight. The favourite speech from this play/movie was one of her favourites.

    Ironically, her winning speech was about copyright, and
    she walked of with the Talent Prize.
    elle: The RST can't handle the truth!
    Just my opinion.

  6. #42
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,381

    Default

    . A foreigner, a hardened criminal, or even a sex offender bum off the street would not think to bother with the CENTS of a ransom demand.
    You're so right about this Cherokee, the cents would be wiped out.

    The ransom note author is obviously detailed oriented. They are also concerned that the ransom amount be clearly understood. Why the preoccupation with this odd amount? Because it is a direct link to John’s “bussiness” that has been mentioned before by the writer.
    Yes! Have always thought the RN author was throwing suspicion on Access Graphic Employees to detract it away from Patsy and John. Patsy was a crafty operator.

    It is now a well-known fact that John Ramsey’s salary bonus that year from Access Graphics was $118,000, but when the ransom note was written, very few people knew that information. Obviously, only John and Patsy, anyone they might have told, and a small circle of Access Graphics employees would be aware of the bonus amount.
    Patsy denied knowing about John's bonus when questioned. She never bothered about things like that, she told Detective Haney or Thomas (?) She was lying. She must have known. Once again she bounces the ball back into the Access Graphic's court.

    The ransom note writer counts on the Access Graphics link because they want to give the impression that SOMEONE in John’s place of business (referenced in the preceding paragraph), not in John’s home, has given the writer information that has lead to the scenario described in the ransom note. The reason is not clear, just as the “foreign faction” is not clear, but that does not matter. The author is desperate to create a reason for JonBenet’s dead body, and as the saying goes, “Any port in a storm.”

    Once again, the writer is trying to put distance between the Ramseys and what happened to JonBenet. Casting suspicion on the employees of Access Graphics is a red herring they hope will help confuse law enforcement. In addition, anyone the Ramseys might have TOLD about the bonus would be another avenue for investigation.
    Did Patsy ever do a good job of throwing Access Graphics under the bus, Cherokee? I'll say she sure did! The staff were taken to task. As you have stated so often, the writer did put distance between the Ramseys and what happened to JonBenét.

    What a great job you're doing here, Cherokee.
    elle: The RST can't handle the truth!
    Just my opinion.

  7. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,381

    Default

    So what are we to make of this verb anomaly?

    In some parts of the southern United States, it is common to use the verb “bring” as a substitute for the verb “take.” This verb transfer is a clue to the identity of the author when added to other regional linguistics found further in the ransom note.

    The instruction to “bring an adequate size attache” is unnecessary and part of the author’s need to tell the story. They are visualizing the scenario as though it was playing out in a movie, from where they probably got most of their ideas for the ransom note. Concern about the “adequate size” of a container for ransom is NOT in the mindset of most kidnappers. Instead, the author begins to write with a linguistic tone that by lines 22 and 23 sounds decidedly female in its concern.

    The use, and correct spelling, of the words “adequate” and “attache” tell us the writer is well educated with a high level vocabulary. A person with a lesser vocabulary would have used words such as “big” and “briefcase” if they even thought about it at all. The adopted French word “attache” has an almost genteel quality, which we will see again later in the ransom note.
    I know we have all been through this ransom note on the boards before and pulled it apart until we were blue in the face, but my hat is off to you for your efforts here, Cherokee. I think Patsy produced a movie in her head and probably enjoyed the process, forgetting Her little six year old was now dead. She was pushed aside for Patsy's dramatic effort of writing this ransom note. You're right, Patsy was instructing instead of demanding.

    What a giveaway. Her Foreign Faction went down the toilet fast. Probably in this fantasy, she didn't want them to get the full credit for her "War and Peace" masterpiece.
    Patsy liked using French words. The little "Bijon Friese" dog was "Jacque" Oh de drama!
    elle: The RST can't handle the truth!
    Just my opinion.

  8. #44

    Default

    About that verb "bring," Cherokee wrote:

    In some parts of the southern United States, it is common to use the verb “bring” as a substitute for the verb “take.” This verb transfer is a clue to the identity of the author when added to other regional linguistics found further in the ransom note.
    I'm from the South, born and bred, many generations going back a couple of centuries, and I have ALWAYS said "I'll bring this to the house" or "Bring this to the party." I never even thought about it.

    You know, in light of my midnight ramblings about the sequence of actions in the basement that night, I ended up with "the ransom note is the only insight we have into the mind of the killer."

    I have to go back and reread and edit those posts, and I'm going to think about what I believe the killer was doing to JonBenet and how those "thought processes" played out during the actual murder, as related in the ransom note.

    Good stuff, Cherokee, good stuff.

    "University of Colorado Law Professor Paul Campos declared the letter a 'reckless exoneration.' He went on to state, 'Everyone knows that relative immunity from criminal conviction is something money can buy.
    Apparently another thing it can buy is an apology for even being suspected of a crime you probably already would have been convicted of committing if you happened to be poor.'"
    FF: WRKJB?

    ~~~~~~~
    Bloomies underwear model:
    3 Dimensional

    ~~~~~~
    My opinions, nothing more.

  9. #45
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,381

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cherokee
    You're absolutely right, Wombat.

    The ransom note actually has a kernel of truth for it's starting point. The reality of JonBenet's death, the cord around her neck (bringing an image of beheading) and her "remains" lying wrapped in the basement is the basis for the fantasy spun by the ransom note writer.

    In psychological terms, the writer is penning a confession of sorts ... or as you put it ... subconsciously they had "some kind of drive to tell the truth."

    The writing of this truth (and the accompanying images in the author's mind) pulls at the author's suppressed emotions and causes a change the tone and writing.
    Are you saying here Cherokee that Patsy was in a way playing a psychological game here, with JonBenét ending up looking like one of the Twinn dolls where the heads can be exchanged, and the string is exposed? Oh this is creepy.

    Patsy Ramsey did write in "Death Of Innocence" about the doll looking like JonBenét in a coffin when she opened the lid, but this was written long after the crime, and it does sound very dramatic She makes the reader think she was a bit off the wall thinking like this on Christmas Eve, about a gift she's about to wrap up for her six year old daughter.

    I know there was a lot of psychology used with both Patsy and John. This is how they are both still free.
    elle: The RST can't handle the truth!
    Just my opinion.

  10. #46

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Elle_1
    I know we have all been through this ransom note on the boards before and pulled it apart until we were blue in the face, but my hat is off to you for your efforts here, Cherokee. I think Patsy produced a movie in her head and probably enjoyed the process, forgetting Her little six year old was now dead. She was pushed aside for Patsy's dramatic effort of writing this ransom note. You're right, Patsy was instructing instead of demanding.

    What a giveaway. Her Foreign Faction went down the toilet fast. Probably in this fantasy, she didn't want them to get the full credit for her "War and Peace" masterpiece.
    Patsy liked using French words. The little "Bijon Friese" dog was "Jacque" Oh de drama!
    You know, that was one reason I was hesitant to post my analyses ... because I know the ransom note has been dissected ad nauseam on the forums for years. I know most JBR posters have heard and seen it all when it comes to the facts of the case and the contents of the ransom note.

    Like I said before, I don't know that I have anything new to say, but perhaps the accompanying discussion will be of benefit to the posters here, and MAYBE some media or law enforcement lurker will see what we're saying here at FFJ, and somehow, someway, let the world know what we know ... that the Ramseys were involved with JonBenet's death and the subsequent cover-up. Even if they are never prosecuted, I don't want the Ramseys to win the PR war if we can help it.

    You are so right that Patsy liked the idea of using French words because she thought it helped her appear to be "high class." Just look at JonBenet's name for an example. She literally "made up" a name by combining the English names "John" and "Bennett" to form the French sounding "JonBenet," complete with the non-spoken final 't' and an accent mark at the end.

  11. #47

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by koldkase
    I'm from the South, born and bred, many generations going back a couple of centuries, and I have ALWAYS said "I'll bring this to the house" or "Bring this to the party." I never even thought about it.
    It's true, isn't it? There are regional differences in the way American English is spoken ... and those differences can be found in the ransom note. We'll see another example in the next section.

    Of course, it doesn't mean that EVERYONE in the South uses words the same way, just as everyone in the North doesn't speak in identical fashion ... but there are regional speech patterns and vocabularies, including specific colloquialisms.

    When I post the next section, I will include a map that shows how linguists have divided the US into different regions based on the areas mentioned above. West Virginia is included in the Southern speech region.

    People have argued that West Virginia, because it split from Virginia during the Civil War and sided with the North, is NOT a Southern state. But linguistically, they are wrong.

    The northwestern part of Virginia (that became West Virginia) is mountainous; the rest of Virginia is not. The mountains did not have plantations, and therefore, did not have the need for slaves. Lowland and coastal Virgina DID have plantations and slaves. So, West Virginia did not have the economic need of slavery, and could afford to side with the Union.

    However, until that split, they were one state with the same heritage and ancestry. One hundred and fifty years later, they are still basically Southern in their speech and customs. I have a friend who is from Beckley, WV, and she has a VERY strong Southern accent and speech patterns. If you didn't know it, you'd think she was Scarlett's sister off the old plantation in "Gone With the Wind."
    Last edited by Cherokee; February 15, 2011, 4:19 pm at Tue Feb 15 16:19:22 UTC 2011.

  12. #48

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Elle_1
    Are you saying here Cherokee that Patsy was in a way playing a psychological game here, with JonBenét ending up looking like one of the Twinn dolls where the heads can be exchanged, and the string is exposed? Oh this is creepy.

    Patsy Ramsey did write in "Death Of Innocence" about the doll looking like JonBenét in a coffin when she opened the lid, but this was written long after the crime, and it does sound very dramatic She makes the reader think she was a bit off the wall thinking like this on Christmas Eve, about a gift she's about to wrap up for her six year old daughter.

    I know there was a lot of psychology used with both Patsy and John. This is how they are both still free.
    Actually, Elle, I wasn't alluding to the My Twinn dolls scenario, but it is an interesting thought.

    I believe the staging of JonBenet's body was already done when the ransom note was written. I also believe the cord was placed around JBR's neck AFTER the head blow in hopes of covering any previous manual, or clothing, strangulation marks on JonBenet's neck that might show up. The cord was worthless as a true strangulation device, so I think it's real purpose was to aid in the staging of the crime scene, and to point away from the Ramseys. ("Who could ever think that loving parents would tie a strangling cord around their child's neck? It would HAVE to be an intruder.")

    With that in mind, the ransom note author concocts the "foreign faction" who is responsible for the mayhem of the crime scene. We know that the writer wants to provide a reason for why JonBenet is found dead in the home. They decide that the Ramseys will "disobey" the kidnappers and their ominous warnings, thus causing JonBenet's death.

    In a flash of inspiration, the ransom note author sees the cord around JonBenet's neck (in their mind) and decides to add the detail that JonBenet will not only be "executed," but "beheaded." Now the writer has successfully delivered on the kidnapper's promise right down to injury, and primary staging done, to JonBenet's neck. The "two gentlemen" were "provoked" because the Ramseys screwed up and called over the whole neighborhood.

    What a nice, neat little story, all tied up in a package with a nylon cord at the end.



Similar Threads

  1. Handwriting analysis
    By rashomon in forum Justice for JonBenet Discussion - Public Forum
    Replies: 97
    Last Post: February 22, 2018, 11:46 am, Thu Feb 22 11:46:22 UTC 2018
  2. Websleuths mentioned in Globe, next week KoldKase & Cherokee have work recognized
    By Tricia in forum Justice for JonBenet Discussion - Public Forum
    Replies: 42
    Last Post: October 15, 2010, 5:41 pm, Fri Oct 15 17:41:41 UTC 2010
  3. Comments to the FOX Analysis
    By 1000 Sparks in forum Justice for JonBenet Discussion - Public Forum
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: January 7, 2005, 5:06 pm, Fri Jan 7 17:06:17 UTC 2005

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •